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surface mount resistor advice, smt resistors vs through hole audio quality
john11
post Mar 4 2013, 08:47
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Hi and thanks for reading this post.

I have a few blown one watt resistors i want to replace in my power amp and am thinking about using surface mount resistors.

Do you think this is a wise move switching from through hole to surface mount, has anyone done this and what are your experiences concerning sound quality changes.

Many thanks in advance. John.
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Arnold B. Kruege...
post Mar 4 2013, 14:29
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QUOTE (john11 @ Mar 4 2013, 02:47) *
Hi and thanks for reading this post.

I have a few blown one watt resistors i want to replace in my power amp and am thinking about using surface mount resistors.

Do you think this is a wise move switching from through hole to surface mount, has anyone done this and what are your experiences concerning sound quality changes.


PC card design for SMT parts is vastly different from that for through-hole parts. It is sometimes thinkable to replace SMT parts with through-hole parts in a pinch. The inverse is generally pretty impractical.

Most of the concern in this area has been that SMT parts don't sound as good as traditional parts.

The real concern is servicability as SMT parts replacement in the field takes new tools, supplies, and procedures.

In fact for audio, it hardly matters one way or the other for final performance of the finished piece. It has been possible to easily build great-sounding equipment either way for well over a decade.

SMT's primary advantage is equal or better total quality for the price including reliability of finished product both initially and over the long term. IOW, its all about money not sound quality.

Like all new technologies there have been teething problems with SMT, but those are in the distant past.

SMT may be more susceptible to tin whisker problems due to ROHS compliance because it tends to put conductors closer together on circuit cards. But again that is not really a problem inherent with SMT, but rather a problem with soldering.


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