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Flac, replay gain and ......
UncleMcFlac
post Nov 1 2012, 13:59
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Hey , can anyone help me? i use foobar ,and have tons of lossless files, i see the function replay gain but im just learning to use it , heres what ive done to tracks that sound way too low , ive increase the decibels and converted the flac file to flac (click on file > convert to> replay gain > move the preamp together> convert), so when i do that is the process irreversible?
and can someone teach me how to apply replay gain? and explain this thing to me ?
Note: since im a noob , what i do is keep my replay gains between -6db to -9db , there are some track like "one direction - whats makes you beautiful" that are about -12 db(that too darn loud), and the "killer - mr brightside" is that loud too but its not bad because it is rock (rock known for distortion) but the OD song just sound like a hiss fest(the person who produce it should go back to mastering or producing school), also the track i mentioned ive turned them down using the method above but i wanna know if that "technically" degrades the song
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yourlord
post Nov 1 2012, 16:17
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The idea behind replaygain is you decide on a reference level you want your library to conform to. When you apply replaygain to a file your software should analyze the average levels of the signal and then calculate a gain level to be applied to make that track (or album) average to the desired level. It then adds one or more tags to the file that simply defines the amount to adjust the level of the output so that the average output level is what you want.

It does NOT change the stored audio. You can revert the file to normal by simply removing the replaygain tags. If you play the file on a player that doesn't support replaygain it will play at the original mastered level.

This post has been edited by yourlord: Nov 1 2012, 16:17
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db1989
post Nov 1 2012, 18:50
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To repeat what yourlord said…
QUOTE (yourlord @ Nov 1 2012, 15:17) *
The idea behind replaygain is you decide on a reference level you want your library to conform to. When you apply replaygain to a file your software should analyze the average levels of the signal and then calculate a gain level to be applied to make that track (or album) average to the desired level. It then adds one or more tags to the file that simply defines the amount to adjust the level of the output so that the average output level is what you want.
…and then to rephrase it: precisely the point of RG is to do the work of levelling them for you, and it does this scientifically rather than estimating as you have been…
QUOTE (UncleMcFlac @ Nov 1 2012, 12:59) *
heres what ive done to tracks that sound way too low , ive increase the decibels and converted the flac file to flac (click on file > convert to> replay gain > move the preamp together> convert), […] what i do is keep my replay gains between -6db to -9db
…so feel free to save yourself the work and let RG take care of it by using it as normal, which will be just fine unless you happen to differ from most other humans in how you perceive average loudness. wink.gif
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dhromed
post Nov 2 2012, 10:30
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QUOTE (db1989 @ Nov 1 2012, 19:50) *
precisely the point of RG is to do the work of levelling them for you, and it does this scientifically rather than estimating as you have been


I never agree with RG. While RG accurately tells me that some hypercompressed pop item needs a good -8dB smacking (I'm looking at you, Gnarls Barkley! pinch.gif ), it also told me that another perfectly mastered bit of Motorpsycho needed -9, and I keep that on 0. It doesn't sound loud to me or hurt my ears at all. So that's why I personally don't scan RG except as an indication.

I imagine hardware is a big part of it: if my headphones somewhat attenuate the 3-8KHz range, then obviously most full-spectrum music like metal and rock sounds far quieter and smoother. Personally, I'm more sensitive to sharp attacks and decays and overemphasized vocals (and we're back to hypercompressed pop! And Tegan & Sara!), even if the music on the whole isn't that loud.

YMMV.

This post has been edited by dhromed: Nov 2 2012, 10:31
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