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Noise from "silent" PC, Trying to fix it!
extracampine
post Dec 3 2012, 00:15
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I don't know as I haven't done that before, but I'm assuming from your answer that there isn't!
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extracampine
post Dec 3 2012, 14:54
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I just looked into desoldering components, and I wonder whether (with my limited expertise) the risk is not worth it (as the main part of the noise is now gone). Is it possible to "bypass" a component, e.g. by creating a connection between its terminals?

This post has been edited by extracampine: Dec 3 2012, 14:55
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Soap
post Dec 3 2012, 15:50
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You don't need to get fancy on the desoldering for a through-pin item like that. Not to say the procedure is w/o risk. All you need to do is heat the pins enough that you can pull the component out and then ensure you haven't created a solder bridge.

You do not want to simply bridge the terminals.

As to if it is "worth it", that is completely your call.


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Porcus
post Dec 3 2012, 18:55
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What about chewing gum?


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extracampine
post Dec 3 2012, 20:36
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You mean stuck over the component ? Might be worth a try i guess!!
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Porcus
post Dec 3 2012, 22:16
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Over and down into the hole.


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JJZolx
post Dec 3 2012, 22:20
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If you do that, be sure to keep an eye out for both smoke and flames. Don't leave the system unattended. wink.gif
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extracampine
post Dec 3 2012, 22:23
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See above - I've already used glue to that effect - I mixed up some Araldite type glue and covered the hole with it. This got rid of the main component of the noise, though there is still a lesser noise that I would ideally like to remove!
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Glenn Gundlach
post Dec 4 2012, 09:19
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QUOTE (extracampine @ Dec 3 2012, 05:54) *
I just looked into desoldering components, and I wonder whether (with my limited expertise) the risk is not worth it (as the main part of the noise is now gone). Is it possible to "bypass" a component, e.g. by creating a connection between its terminals?


If the noise is gone, thank the PC gods and DO NOT create shorts on the motherboard. It may not cause damage but it's much better to not experiment. Personally, I'd put a dot of hot glue over the hole in the noise maker. It would quiet it dramatically and clean off with a hair dryer if needed.

G
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Porcus
post Dec 4 2012, 18:14
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QUOTE (extracampine @ Dec 3 2012, 22:23) *
See above - I've already used glue to that effect


Ah, mea culpa, I thought you were merely considering it.

I personally would have thought twice before soldering on a motherboard. Actually, before doing that I would have checked if I could cut off the component (breaking its legs without touching the mobo itself). But even before that: what about thick tape of the type used to glue photos to albums etc.? http://www.bosstapes.com.au/2108.jpg


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extracampine
post Dec 4 2012, 18:44
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More great replies, thanks!

The glue has removed the main part of the noise, but there is a lesser residual noise (as long as the firewire DAC is plugged in). This residual noise is probably not audible from the listening position unless the room is in complete silence (rare with fridge in kitchen, occasional cars, boiler, etc), though being a perfectionist I would ideally like to remove this also!

I tried to remove the component by heating the pins, though even when trying to touch the solder itself with the soldering iron directly (there isnt much solder around the pins) I couldnt seem to get the solder to melt or the component to move. My soldering iron is 18w so I guess its possible that I need a more powerful one.

Clipping the pins as mentioned above would seem easier and less prone to accident - would this be ok and not compromise the integrity of the circuit? I would need an extremely tiny clipper to get underneath the component to clip the pins though! I'm not sure tape would be insulating enough and furthermore would introduce foreign body into the machine interior.

This post has been edited by extracampine: Dec 4 2012, 18:47
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Soap
post Dec 4 2012, 21:25
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QUOTE (extracampine @ Dec 4 2012, 12:44) *
Clipping the pins as mentioned above would seem easier and less prone to accident - would this be ok and not compromise the integrity of the circuit? I would need an extremely tiny clipper to get underneath the component to clip the pins though! I'm not sure tape would be insulating enough and furthermore would introduce foreign body into the machine interior.


I hesitate to recommend that someone I don't know do this, but (be warned).

That piezo-electric speaker is (very likely) nothing more than a flat metal membrane with the piezo bonded to the bottom, and two leads. All this inside a hollow, thin-wall, plastic case.

I have removed very similar ones (from my UPSs) where back-of-the-board access was problematic by squeezing the plastic body with slip-jaw pliers until the body shatters, then clipping the exposed pins.

Dirty dirty hack, but no damage done to the board.

But why not just fill the hollow plastic body with glue? It will absolutely silence the piezo. Any other noise is a different concern.


This post has been edited by Soap: Dec 4 2012, 21:26


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extracampine
post Dec 4 2012, 21:54
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Removing the component completely would rule out the remaining noise being due to it. Filling it with glue, although likely removing the noise, may leave the the possibility. I have already covered the hole with glue, so would need to remove this somehow to get more glue into the hole!
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Porcus
post Dec 4 2012, 22:19
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Is the noise still there if you hold that thing firmly between your fingers? If there is still noise, and you don't feel any vibrations ... then maybe use your ears to locate some other source?

But ... put the thing in a padded box, I'd say.


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extracampine
post Dec 4 2012, 22:53
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Yes, the noise is still there if i do that. Ive tried to locate the other source but as the components are so small its difficult!
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extracampine
post Dec 14 2012, 21:18
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QUOTE (zenpmd @ Oct 21 2012, 06:34) *
I had exactly this problem! But there is a solution! Its basically changing the software settings out power supply management and is completed as follows:

Its all very weird, but this stopped the (capacitors, I think) sound:

1. Execute: "regedit"
2 .Locate: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE \ SYSTEM \ CurrentControlSet \ Control \ Power \ PowerSettings \ 54533251-82be-4824-96c1-47b60b740d00 \ 5d76a2ca-e8c0-402f-a133-2158492d58ad
3. Change Attributes from 1 to 0.
4. Then, through the control panel - power - in the settings mode select power management processor. There will be an option disabling idle processor and high pitched noise immediately disappears.

Taken from this thread:

http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/forum/292 ... oming-area


Zenpmd - somehow I managed to overlook your post before, and found it just now.

I would like to say - thanks!! After changing this power setting as you describe, it has gotten rid of most of the remaining noise!! There is a little bit left, but it's even quieter and definitely not audible from the listening position. What was causing this noise that disappears when this setting is changed?

biggrin.gif
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