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Using 250ohm headphones with amp and computer
starbux58
post Sep 5 2012, 11:58
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I have found a reseller for Beyerdynamic DT990 headphones that is selling the 250ohm model for half that of the other models 32ohm and 600ohm. So the 250ohm model is within my financial reach as its $200 US lower than the others. I am also buying an integrated stereo amplifier from NAD electronics in Canada to use the Beyers with primarily. Does anyone know if the standard headphone jacks on amplifiers and receivers will adequately drive or power these? I can buy some AKG's that I know will work but have wanted to try these Beyers for awhile now. I know too that companies like FiiO make affordable (for my budget)desktop amps too that could work with the Beyers.
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pdq
post Sep 5 2012, 14:29
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Some amplifiers might have problems driving 32 ohms, but I doubt there are any that have difficulty driving 250 ohms.

Are you sure this model is similar to the others other than impedance? The low price sounds suspicious.
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dhromed
post Sep 5 2012, 15:25
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QUOTE (pdq @ Sep 5 2012, 15:29) *
Some amplifiers might have problems driving 32 ohms, but I doubt there are any that have difficulty driving 250 ohms.


Shouldn't that be the other way around? 250 is a higher resistance than 32, requiring more power from the amplifier. Maybe I'm mixing up the sequence of events here.
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saratoga
post Sep 5 2012, 16:12
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QUOTE (dhromed @ Sep 5 2012, 10:25) *
QUOTE (pdq @ Sep 5 2012, 15:29) *
Some amplifiers might have problems driving 32 ohms, but I doubt there are any that have difficulty driving 250 ohms.


Shouldn't that be the other way around?


No, its correct.

QUOTE (dhromed @ Sep 5 2012, 10:25) *
250 is a higher resistance than 32, requiring more power from the amplifier. Maybe I'm mixing up the sequence of events here.


Higher resistance doesn't require more power. P=I^2*R. So if you increase the resistance, less current is required from the amp at a given power, and hence the amplifier likely performs better.
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Arnold B. Kruege...
post Sep 6 2012, 16:17
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QUOTE (saratoga @ Sep 5 2012, 11:12) *
Higher resistance doesn't require more power. P=I^2*R. So if you increase the resistance, less current is required from the amp at a given power, and hence the amplifier likely performs better.


The exposure that you pick up is that high impedance phones are more likely to require more voltage for a given level of loudness.

250 ohm phones may require up to as bit more 3 times more voltage than 25 ohm phones for a given SPL at the ear.

Many portable music players are voltage-limited, so this can be a real issue.
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