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Any guide to the bitrates/sound quality of different UK radio formats?, Split from: BBC Radio 3 320kbps stream / Topic ID: 94413 (TOS #5)
icstm
post Apr 10 2012, 11:06
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sorry to ask a slightly OT...
is there a good guide to bitrates/sound quality to UK radio.

Satellite >= DVT > DAB, but where is FM?
Also is there a list of bitrates anywhere for the TV sources?
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slks
post Apr 10 2012, 21:15
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FM radio is an analog broadcast, so it doesn't have a bit rate and there's no single number to compare it with the digital broadcasts. With FM the main thing affecting quality is simply how good of a signal you pick up - is the signal strong enough, is there any interference, etc. Hissing and dropouts are symptoms of poor reception.

With digital broadcasts, you can't pick up a "fuzzy" signal, you either get the bits successfully or you don't. So, once you've picked up a digital broadcast, the quality's going to be determined by the digital parameters like which codec and bit rate is being used. Unfortunately I've got no idea what they use for the digital broadcasts.


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knutinh
post Apr 11 2012, 08:18
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QUOTE (slks @ Apr 10 2012, 22:15) *
With digital broadcasts, you can't pick up a "fuzzy" signal, you either get the bits successfully or you don't. So, once you've picked up a digital broadcast, the quality's going to be determined by the digital parameters like which codec and bit rate is being used. Unfortunately I've got no idea what they use for the digital broadcasts.

There is a thing called "soft degradation" where digital transmission is designed such that the quality received will be gradually degraded (analog to how FM radio degrades) when the signal quality is degraded.

But you are right in that the simple implementation of text-book digital designs, you will typically either have sound, or none. After the initial losses incured by the lossy encoder, that is.

-k
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