IPB

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

5 Pages V  « < 3 4 5  
Reply to this topicStart new topic
Quantization Grid, Split from Topic ID #55966
greynol
post Mar 22 2012, 15:12
Post #101





Group: Super Moderator
Posts: 10339
Joined: 1-April 04
From: San Francisco
Member No.: 13167



There could be some if the signal was sufficiently low, synthesized or dithered.

This post has been edited by greynol: Mar 22 2012, 15:14


--------------------
Your eyes cannot hear.
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
saratoga
post Mar 22 2012, 15:23
Post #102





Group: Members
Posts: 5167
Joined: 2-September 02
Member No.: 3264



QUOTE (greynol @ Mar 22 2012, 07:55) *
My text books on the subject speak clearly about quantization error, so I reject KMD's claim to the contrary. Maybe the problem has to do with glancing at pictures instead of reading the text and equations?

KMD has posted this claim before. When I asked him which textbook exactly he was referring to, he declined to answer. I think he should either cite his source, or stop arguing about it.

This post has been edited by greynol: Mar 22 2012, 18:28
Reason for edit: quote trimmage
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Notat
post Mar 22 2012, 15:44
Post #103





Group: Members
Posts: 581
Joined: 17-August 09
Member No.: 72373



QUOTE (2Bdecided @ Mar 21 2012, 09:34) *
with dither...
[attachment=6984:fft_dither.jpg]

David, is this the spectrum of the 8-bit version (signal) or the difference (quantization error)?
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
2Bdecided
post Mar 22 2012, 16:03
Post #104


ReplayGain developer


Group: Developer
Posts: 5364
Joined: 5-November 01
From: Yorkshire, UK
Member No.: 409



The 8-bit signal (which include quantisation error), but analysed at the end of this process...
http://www.hydrogenaudio.org/forums/index....st&p=790120
...which was to show that individual quantisation steps can kind-of survive reconstruction filtering. I guess it also shows that dither "works", though there is no need for those extra steps if that's what you want to prove.

Cheers,
David.

This post has been edited by greynol: Mar 22 2012, 18:29
Reason for edit: quote prunage
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Glenn Gundlach
post Mar 23 2012, 04:37
Post #105





Group: Members
Posts: 372
Joined: 19-April 08
From: LA
Member No.: 52914



QUOTE (KMD @ Mar 10 2012, 12:30) *
The quantization grid is not caused by sampling it is caused by the interaction of quantization levels with sampling points. It may not be perceptable but there is no doubt that a waveform created from a digital file must be formed from a selection of points that are selected from a finite number of pre- determined regularly spaced co-ordinates. The digital file is formed from regularly spaced sampling points and reguarly spaced quantization levels therefore the waveform derived from it must have a coresponding regularity.


I work more in commercial TV where video has been digitized since the mid '70s. If what you're describing existed you would not be able to to display diagonal lines, particularly nearly vertical ones. I assure that is not the case. The time resolution is infinitely variable. OK, I can only measure reliably to a nanosecond but for all practical purposes....

G
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
2Bdecided
post Mar 23 2012, 10:22
Post #106


ReplayGain developer


Group: Developer
Posts: 5364
Joined: 5-November 01
From: Yorkshire, UK
Member No.: 409



QUOTE (Glenn Gundlach @ Mar 23 2012, 03:37) *
I work more in commercial TV where video has been digitized since the mid '70s. If what you're describing existed you would not be able to to display diagonal lines, particularly nearly vertical ones. I assure that is not the case.
Actually, images and video resist the use of "ideal" filters, so aliasing is quite common. Those diagonal lines are often quite "steppy".

Cheers,
David.
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
dhromed
post Mar 23 2012, 14:24
Post #107





Group: Members
Posts: 1339
Joined: 16-February 08
From: NL
Member No.: 51347



QUOTE (2Bdecided @ Mar 23 2012, 10:22) *
Actually, images and video resist the use of "ideal" filters, so aliasing is quite common. Those diagonal lines are often quite "steppy".


Surely that is because most visual output devices have the same or lower resolution than/as the input signal?
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
2Bdecided
post Mar 23 2012, 14:38
Post #108


ReplayGain developer


Group: Developer
Posts: 5364
Joined: 5-November 01
From: Yorkshire, UK
Member No.: 409



QUOTE (dhromed @ Mar 23 2012, 13:24) *
QUOTE (2Bdecided @ Mar 23 2012, 10:22) *
Actually, images and video resist the use of "ideal" filters, so aliasing is quite common. Those diagonal lines are often quite "steppy".


Surely that is because most visual output devices have the same or lower resolution than/as the input signal?
No, it's because you can't use a sinc filter with a picture because you'll introduce visible ringing.

Full HD TV, 1:1 pixel mapped LCD - two examples of matched resolution to source - none have any filter on the output.

Similar problems with image capture for HD video.

Lesser problems these days for still images, because the lens itself often acts as a low pass filter for the x-mega-pixel sensor.

But you can't cleanly get "close" to the nyquist limit with images - not as close as you can with audio.

Cheers,
David.
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
icstm
post Mar 23 2012, 14:59
Post #109





Group: Members
Posts: 121
Joined: 25-January 12
Member No.: 96698



QUOTE (2Bdecided @ Mar 23 2012, 13:38) *
Lesser problems these days for still images, because the lens itself often acts as a low pass filter for the x-mega-pixel sensor.
you mean the lens on the sensor within the chip or the main lens? I think there are filters within the sensor. I have a vague recollection in my head, but I cannot remember what does filters and lenses do on the sensor.
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
2Bdecided
post Mar 23 2012, 15:04
Post #110


ReplayGain developer


Group: Developer
Posts: 5364
Joined: 5-November 01
From: Yorkshire, UK
Member No.: 409



QUOTE (icstm @ Mar 23 2012, 13:59) *
QUOTE (2Bdecided @ Mar 23 2012, 13:38) *
Lesser problems these days for still images, because the lens itself often acts as a low pass filter for the x-mega-pixel sensor.
you mean the lens on the sensor within the chip or the main lens? I think there are filters within the sensor. I have a vague recollection in my head, but I cannot remember what does filters and lenses do on the sensor.
There is usually a filter in front of the sensor. But you can't do the "flat to within a few percent of nyquist / kill everything above nyquist" response we're used to in audio.

Some people think they can do better than is usually achieved these days...
http://www.imaging.org/ist/publications/re...1_MA_7876_4.pdf

Cheers,
David.
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
saratoga
post Mar 23 2012, 16:47
Post #111





Group: Members
Posts: 5167
Joined: 2-September 02
Member No.: 3264



QUOTE (icstm @ Mar 23 2012, 08:59) *
QUOTE (2Bdecided @ Mar 23 2012, 13:38) *
Lesser problems these days for still images, because the lens itself often acts as a low pass filter for the x-mega-pixel sensor.
you mean the lens on the sensor within the chip or the main lens? I think there are filters within the sensor. I have a vague recollection in my head, but I cannot remember what does filters and lenses do on the sensor.


A lens is a low pass filter, so in practice it serves as the anti-aliasing filter if nothing else. Likewise, the pixels on a camera tend to be quite wide relative to their pitch so they'll integrate over a finite width and thus further lowpass the signal.

Often though some degree of aliasing is tolerated in imaging systems because its difficult to build optical filters with steep drop offs. Its quite common to design imaging systems with the spot size of the optics matched to 2x the pixel size, and then to just let the finite pixel width low pass out much of the frequencies that would alias.

This post has been edited by saratoga: Mar 23 2012, 16:49
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post

5 Pages V  « < 3 4 5
Reply to this topicStart new topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 27th December 2014 - 03:43