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[not bothering to read the article that is supposedly being discussed], From: Violinists cannot differentiate between Stradivarius+new, 92697
mzil
post Jan 5 2012, 01:00
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This test should have been triple blind; the test subject, test conductor, AND the violinist must be unaware which is the Strad.

If you tell a musician they are about to play a legendary, work of art, it obviously will change their attitude and performance. They may play more aggressively, be more punchy, etc. or their enthusiasm may make them sway Left and Right more (think Ray Charles at the piano when He's happy) which would vary the sound both live, or as picked up by a mic.

My 2 cents.
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db1989
post Jan 5 2012, 01:09
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>implying the violinists were privy to the identities of the instruments

The test was a true “double-blind” one, as neither the players nor the people who gave them the violins had any way of knowing which instrument was which. The room was dimly lit. The players were wearing goggles so they couldn’t see properly. The instruments had dabs of perfume on the chinrests that blocked out any distinctive smells. And even though Fritz and Curtin knew which the identities of the six violins, they only passed the instruments to the players via other researchers, who were hidden by screens, wearing their own goggles, and quite literally in the dark.
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mzil
post Jan 5 2012, 01:53
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^OOPs, I missed that, sorry. My bad.
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I wonder if a trained person could tell by the flex of the neck, the smoothness of the wood surface, the squishiness of the chin rest or the size of its chin indentation crater...
the weight, [The taste of the nylon vs catgut strings.... Yuck.]

My point is you have to have an expert on violin construction who can point these things out which the test researchers may be clueless about.

I know nothing about violins.
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edit to add:
QUOTE
>implying the violinists were privy to the identities of the instruments


Could be at a subconscious level, too. They weren't "cheating" per say, but the heft of the real thing could have still influenced them.

This post has been edited by mzil: Jan 5 2012, 01:59
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