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Glue cleaning, An interesting approach to cleaning records
Canar
post Sep 21 2010, 19:07
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http://www.andrewdubber.com/2010/07/gluing-my-records/

The guy coats a record in glue, waits for it to set, then peels it off. Apparently it works very well. I'm not sure how it compares to other techniques, so I figured I'd run it by you guys and see what you think.


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DVDdoug
post Sep 21 2010, 20:16
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There was a commercial record cleaner that used a similar concept... I don't remember the name, but it came in a bottle with a sponge applicator attached to the top. I believe the substance was water-based and it was rubbery when dry (kind-of like rubber cement). It wasn't too sticky or strong so it was easy to remove and it didn't damage the label if you happen to get some on it. IIRC, the drying time was not as long as his glue.

I liked the product! But it was never that popular, and it dissapeared from the market (before vinyl "dissapeared".)

I also remember reading about people making something similar "at home" (with gelatin, I think).
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Sunhillow
post Sep 21 2010, 20:31
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In Germany this product was called Discofilm (--> Google it smile.gif )

After use it could be dissolved in warm water and propanol what made it a bit less expensive..

This post has been edited by Sunhillow: Sep 21 2010, 20:31
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DVDdoug
post Sep 21 2010, 21:41
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Yeah! "DiscoFilm" sounds right! smile.gif

I was looking around and I found something called Record Revirginizer.
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krabapple
post Sep 22 2010, 00:35
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QUOTE (Canar @ Sep 21 2010, 14:07) *
http://www.andrewdubber.com/2010/07/gluing-my-records/

The guy coats a record in glue, waits for it to set, then peels it off. Apparently it works very well. I'm not sure how it compares to other techniques, so I figured I'd run it by you guys and see what you think.



The 'ooh shiny' record he shows at the end clearly isn't the same one as in the other pics. Wonder why?


Anyway, yes, there was a product like this in the States, bacl in the late 1970s, and yes, it was difficult to get the whole film off in one piece.

This post has been edited by krabapple: Sep 22 2010, 00:45
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Roseval
post Sep 22 2010, 12:55
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A couple of years ago I stumbled upon this one: http://www.audiokarma.org/forums/showthread.php?t=99837


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analog scott
post Sep 22 2010, 17:30
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There are a lot of different PVC glues with various ingredients. I would be very cautious.
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googlebot
post Sep 22 2010, 18:07
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QUOTE (analog scott @ Sep 22 2010, 18:30) *
There are a lot of different PVC glues with various ingredients. I would be very cautious.


PVC glue would mean a 100% record destruction guarantee, that's why PVA glue has been recommended... wink.gif

But I would also not recommend to use this method. It may work with very old pure PVC records, but for a couple of decades vinyl records are being made of a PVC/PVA copolymer (about 5-15% PVA). At the time of pressing the shorter chained PVA molecules even move preferably to the outer surface. So if you are unlucky you end up with an inseparable PVA/PVA bond in the end.

This post has been edited by googlebot: Sep 22 2010, 18:08
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2Bdecided
post Sep 22 2010, 19:37
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QUOTE (googlebot @ Sep 22 2010, 18:07) *
But I would also not recommend to use this method. It may work with very old pure PVC records, but for a couple of decades vinyl records are being made of a PVC/PVA copolymer (about 5-15% PVA). At the time of pressing the shorter chained PVA molecules even move preferably to the outer surface. So if you are unlucky you end up with an inseparable PVA/PVA bond in the end.
...OK, but PVA is water soluble - wouldn't 10% PVA in vinyl mean that you simply can't wash these records without making the surface dissolve?! Or does the 90% PVC cancel this effect? (I dropped Chemistry!).

Cheers,
David.

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googlebot
post Sep 22 2010, 19:46
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PVA is not water soluble.
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cliveb
post Sep 22 2010, 20:14
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QUOTE (googlebot @ Sep 22 2010, 19:46) *
PVA is not water soluble.

Perhaps David (2Bdecided) is being misled by the fact that PVA glue mixes easily with water resulting in a thinner consistency. But it's not dissolving - PVA glue is an emulsion with water, and when it dries, the remaining pure PVA is indeed waterproof. (That's why furniture doesn't fall apart if it gets wet :-)

Back to the original thread subject: I tried the "PVA film" trick many years back, but (probably due to my incompetence in application) found that it would nearly always tear into small strips when attempting the "peel". I gave up and bought a Moth vacuum machine.

This post has been edited by cliveb: Sep 22 2010, 20:15
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analog scott
post Sep 23 2010, 01:33
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QUOTE (googlebot @ Sep 22 2010, 18:07) *
QUOTE (analog scott @ Sep 22 2010, 18:30) *
There are a lot of different PVC glues with various ingredients. I would be very cautious.


PVC glue would mean a 100% record destruction guarantee, that's why PVA glue has been recommended... wink.gif

But I would also not recommend to use this method. It may work with very old pure PVC records, but for a couple of decades vinyl records are being made of a PVC/PVA copolymer (about 5-15% PVA). At the time of pressing the shorter chained PVA molecules even move preferably to the outer surface. So if you are unlucky you end up with an inseparable PVA/PVA bond in the end.



hehehehe yeah. I meant PVA sorry. I think the confusion over water solubility is due to the fact that there is PVA Polyvinyl acetate and PVA polyvinyl alcohol. Polyvinyl alcohol is used as a seperator for mold making and casting involving fiberglass and other resign based molds and castings. That PVA is water soluble after it dries. Ironically it does not thin with water like Polyvinyl acetate.
http://www.fibreglast.com/product/PVA_Rele...3/Mold_Releases
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