IPB

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

 
Reply to this topicStart new topic
Ideal Motherboards for sound recording
amanzin
post Mar 14 2010, 06:02
Post #1





Group: Members
Posts: 4
Joined: 25-June 03
Member No.: 7383



I'm trying to build a computer to transfer a ton of cassette tapes to high-quality digital format. Are there any motherboards that are designed specifically with sound recording in mind. For example, motherboards that are low-electronic noise and that don't have bad built-in soundcards? Any recommendations?

Thanks!
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Slipstreem
post Mar 14 2010, 06:54
Post #2





Group: Members
Posts: 966
Joined: 7-July 06
Member No.: 32660



I guess that depends how high you set the bar in terms of the performance you're expecting, but the onboard sound on my current budget Gigabyte motherboard fulfills my needs and looks pretty good on paper against some of the opposition. It was my dream PC media centre mobo at the time and still is.

It's very hard to source this particular motherboard now, but it gives you some idea how good they can be without spending a fortune. It was around 50UK IIRC. smile.gif

Link (Click the graphs to expand)

This post has been edited by Slipstreem: Mar 14 2010, 07:07
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
DJAd
post Mar 14 2010, 07:59
Post #3





Group: Members
Posts: 31
Joined: 23-January 03
From: Here
Member No.: 4699



What is the point of building a monster PC to transfer CASSETTE tapes?! I would imagine the quality of the tapes is pretty low already so a good soundcard and decent recording software should be a main priority. Also it might be worth looking at getting a decent tape deck with some new heads before undertaking such a project.
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
odigg
post Mar 14 2010, 16:52
Post #4





Group: Members
Posts: 629
Joined: 25-July 08
From: USA
Member No.: 56264



From what I've seen of measurements, full ATX boards tend to measure better than MicroATX and other smaller sized motherboards. Other than that, I recommend a brand with a good reputation (e.g. Asus, Gigabyte) as they *may* put more care into designing the motherboard.

There is nothing much beyond that point. Current motherboards have sound inputs/outputs that measure well so just pick one that you like. If you google a motherboard model you are interested in you may be able to find RMAA measurements for. I've found that some Russian and Chinese review sites include RMAA testing in their motherboard reviews. You may not be able to understand the language, but the graphs are easy to interpret.

Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Jens Rex
post Mar 14 2010, 17:20
Post #5





Group: Super Moderator
Posts: 605
Joined: 18-December 01
Member No.: 680



Motherboard doesn't matter at all. I was transferring LP's on an AMD K6 300 Mhz back in the 90's. If you're serious about this, I recommend buying a semi-pro external audio interface. They aren't that expensive.
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
odigg
post Mar 14 2010, 18:55
Post #6





Group: Members
Posts: 629
Joined: 25-July 08
From: USA
Member No.: 56264



QUOTE (JensRex @ Mar 14 2010, 12:20) *
Motherboard doesn't matter at all. I was transferring LP's on an AMD K6 300 Mhz back in the 90's.


Which probably means you had an dedicated sound card. My motherboard's onboard sound (5.5 year old Asus) adds an audible amount of hiss to recordings of everything, even tape. I know of one motherboard (and older ECS model) with a sound device that constantly pops.

QUOTE
If you're serious about this, I recommend buying a semi-pro external audio interface. They aren't that expensive.


100% agree. A Behringer UCA202 can be purchased for $30 and is arguably better than spending your time trying to search for RMAA measurements for motherboards you are interested in.

This post has been edited by odigg: Mar 14 2010, 18:56
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Fandango
post Mar 14 2010, 20:36
Post #7





Group: Members
Posts: 1549
Joined: 13-August 03
Member No.: 8353



Since Intel introduced HD Audio in 2004, onboard sound has become pretty sufficient qualitywise. If your motherboard's line in is good enough, then why bother buying extra equipment?

Record some silence from line-in and amplify the recording. Then have a look at the spectrum.
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
lvqcl
post Mar 14 2010, 21:44
Post #8





Group: Developer
Posts: 3418
Joined: 2-December 07
Member No.: 49183



I can hear HDD activity when listen to music via onboard codec (old ASUS motherboard, IIRC A8N32)...
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Arnold B. Kruege...
post Mar 15 2010, 16:38
Post #9





Group: Members
Posts: 4012
Joined: 29-October 08
From: USA, 48236
Member No.: 61311



QUOTE (lvqcl @ Mar 14 2010, 15:44) *
I can hear HDD activity when listen to music via onboard codec (old ASUS motherboard, IIRC A8N32)...


The sound quality of the chips on modern motherboards (and the OP was talking about building a new machine) was acceptable back in 2005-2006 when the A8N32 was new, but for a variety of reasons, the kinds of problems you mention were not uncommon.

Both the quality of the chips and the implementations have only improved significantly since then. One reason for this is the growth of the HTPC segment of the market. There's a good chance that a motherboard with egregiously noisy audio will be returned as being defective, and manufactuers now have a healthy fear for returns.
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
RonaldDumsfeld
post Mar 16 2010, 13:25
Post #10





Group: Members
Posts: 337
Joined: 12-June 09
Member No.: 70617



If you are set on a project to build a PC specifically for rerecording audio you might want to consider the new type of low power systems.

Some thing like the Zotac Ion n330 sounds ideal for your purpose. dual core Atom processor. No fan operation. Seperate power supply. It even has an Nvidia 9400M on board under a big heatsink. Quite tempted myself but i'm not an expert so i'd do some more checking around.

Although really, like JensRex already mentioned, you might be well advised to buy a off board soundcard/DAC like the E-MU 0202 or M-Audio Fast Track. That way you can use any PC, anytime and if anything get better results.
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post

Reply to this topicStart new topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 30th October 2014 - 20:31