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Should I use an external CD Drive to get Super Accurate Rips of my CD
Brian.Audio
post Feb 20 2010, 01:28
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Hi there, I've got a 1st generation MacBook Pro and I'm looking to finally rip my CD Collection.

I want to do it once and rip everything lossless. (It boggles my mind that music companies don't sell all the albums I have as lossless downloads already...)

Anyway, should I be using some sort of external CD drive to get the best rips or is their no difference with the drive my Mac came with ?
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hellokeith
post Feb 20 2010, 05:39
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Not likely any differences, but I'd be worried about ruining the drive with so may rips and then having to deal with laptop repair.
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Porcus
post Feb 20 2010, 06:59
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From experience with dBpoweramp on Billware: C2 error pointers are less likely to be transmitted over USB or firewire. Best chances of full error correction features obtained by using an internal one.

No need to worry on tracks with AccurateRip match though.

This post has been edited by Porcus: Feb 20 2010, 07:00


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Ryan Woloshen
post Feb 26 2010, 16:44
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QUOTE (Brian.Audio @ Feb 20 2010, 01:28) *
Hi there, I've got a 1st generation MacBook Pro and I'm looking to finally rip my CD Collection.

I want to do it once and rip everything lossless. (It boggles my mind that music companies don't sell all the albums I have as lossless downloads already...)

Anyway, should I be using some sort of external CD drive to get the best rips or is their no difference with the drive my Mac came with ?


Well, if you're concerned about ripping lead-in, lead-out, htoa, and C2 correction, then you would want to do your research and detect what features your drive supports. You will also want to find out what your offset is as well to get the most accurate rip possible. I hope this helps.
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greynol
post Feb 26 2010, 21:30
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Considering that the reference used for offset calibration has been called into question for being "exact", configuring an offset correction does not make your rips more "accurate". I would keep these two ideas (offset calibration and accuracy) separate from one another.


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db1989
post Feb 26 2010, 22:18
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Yeah, it may help to think of offset correction as aiding tests of accuracy.

In case the OP or anyone who stumbles upon this topic (perhaps even via search results! ohmy.gif) is interested in features like those listed by Ryan, two good resources are the DAE features drive database and AccurateRip's page on offsets. If the drive type is unknown, check using the method relevant to your system (e.g. System Profiler in OS X; Control Panel in Windows).
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Ryan Woloshen
post Feb 27 2010, 22:35
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True, I would agree that offset doesn't make rips any more accurate than other. So, forgive me if I mislead you into believing otherwise. I was simply pointing out other factors to consider while ripping with your MacBook Pro drive, and using other drives, that's all I meant to point out.
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chrizoo
post Nov 4 2010, 14:57
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QUOTE (Porcus @ Feb 20 2010, 05:59) *
From experience with dBpoweramp on Billware: C2 error pointers are less likely to be transmitted over USB or firewire. Best chances of full error correction features obtained by using an internal one.


Same situation here: I want to buy an external CD drive for my laptop because my internal one (NEC ND-6500A) produces more errors compared to the CD drives in my desktop computers.

I was alerted by Porcus remark about C2 error transmission. Is this transmission technically possible at all via USB connection?
In case it is and that the external drive supports C2 error detection, what would be the culprit if C2 errors are not transmitted?

- CD drive? (to be purchased in my case)
- OS? (XP in my case)
- DAE software? (EAC in my case)

In other words, is it enough to look out for an external CD drive with C2 error support?

Other question: Generally speaking, are external DVD/CD burners worse concerning correct audio extraction than external DVD/CD-ROMs or even simple CD-ROMs only?

Many thanks.


EDIT: I found the following hint:
http://www.dbpoweramp.com/Version-Changes-DMC.htm

QUOTE
Release 13.3
[...]
New option: CD Ripping >> Options >> Secure Settings >> 8KB Transfers (c2 Pointers over USB / Firewire)


This post has been edited by chrizoo: Nov 4 2010, 15:09
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DonP
post Nov 4 2010, 18:03
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QUOTE (hellokeith @ Feb 20 2010, 00:39) *
Not likely any differences, but I'd be worried about ruining the drive with so may rips and then having to deal with laptop repair.


I would expect a standard drive in an outboard case would be faster and more durable. ON my last laptop a replacement drive would be more expensive, but easy DIY since it was a modular bay that could take different devices.
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Arnold B. Kruege...
post Nov 5 2010, 15:12
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QUOTE (DonP @ Nov 4 2010, 13:03) *
QUOTE (hellokeith @ Feb 20 2010, 00:39) *
Not likely any differences, but I'd be worried about ruining the drive with so may rips and then having to deal with laptop repair.


I would expect a standard drive in an outboard case would be faster and more durable. ON my last laptop a replacement drive would be more expensive, but easy DIY since it was a modular bay that could take different devices.


I've had to replace a few laptop optical drives over the years. However, the machines typically had pretty heroic service.

I don't think that laptop drives are inherently less durable than standard drives as a practical matter. Optiarc seems to be the brand of choice for replacement laptop drives right now.
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