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What is the effective bit rate of vinyl?, LP recording
klockworks
post Jul 14 2005, 07:27
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I would like to record my vinyl and would like to know what the effective bit rate is of a vinyl (LP) recording? Anyone? Or is this a silly question?


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cliveb
post Jul 14 2005, 09:13
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QUOTE (klockworks @ Jul 14 2005, 07:27 AM)
I would like to record my vinyl and would like to know what the effective bit rate is of a vinyl (LP) recording? Anyone? Or is this a silly question?
*

Not a silly question at all. To determine the effective bit rate necessary to fully capture the information on a vinyl LP, you need to know the bandwidth and the dynamic range. A typical vinyl LP has a bandwidth of about 18kHz (when it's brand new, it might get up to about 22kHz). There is certainly some audio stuff above that, but it generally bears no relation to meaningful programme material (ie. it's noise and distortion). So let's be generous and assume a bandwidth of 22kHz: you'll need to sample this at 44kHz. The dynamic range of a beautifully pressed LP on virgin vinyl can get to about 65-70dB on a good day with a following wind, which equates to slightly less than 12 bits. So the bit rate required is 44,000 x 12 x 2 (for stereo), giving about 1030kbs. A more typical LP (18kHz bandwidth, dynamic range of 55dB) needs a bit rate of about 650kbs. For comparison purposes, the CD bit rate is 1378kbs.

As to what format to record vinyl in, there is little point in using anything higher than 44.1/16: exceeding this does nothing other than consume more disk space. If you are intending to do huge amounts of post-processing, you *might* consider recording at 24bit rather than 16bit to avoid any possibility of rounding errors during processing. But to be frank, even 16bit gives you vast amounts of space to do plenty of processing and still keep the rounding errors way below the vinyl noise floor.
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CosmoKramer
post Jul 14 2005, 15:43
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QUOTE (cliveb @ Jul 14 2005, 09:13 AM)
For comparison purposes, the CD bit rate is 1378kbs.
*


Hmm..

44100*16*2 = 1411200 = 1411.2 kbps.


We are talking about bits, not bytes. 1 kb = 1000 bits.
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