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True Audio Analyzer 1.0, for Windows NT/2000/XP
Bern
post Sep 17 2004, 12:16
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auCDtect developer


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True Audio Analyzer 1.0 - is a next generation of a popular AuCDtect, the program for determining the authenticity of musical CD records, and predicting is it an original studio record or a reconstruction from a lossy encoded data (for example MP3). Tau Analyzer works directly with CD and has a some additional functions such as a Spectrum and Frequency analyzers, ATIP and ISRC data readers, etc. System requirements: Windows NT/2000/XP. Windows NT usage requires installation of the GDI+ package from Microsoft™

We a planning to continue developing freeware auCDtect tool as very useful console tool for Windows/Linux users and as core algorithm for Tau Analyzer and in near time will build official auCDtect-0.8.

For detailed inofrmation, please visit
http://www.true-audio.com/
To download shareware verison of Tau Analyzer, please use this url:
http://www.true-audio.com/ftp/TauAnalyzer-setup.exe

Best Regards,
Oleg
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buzzy
post Dec 14 2004, 15:02
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An interesting project. Without knowing the details of how it detects - it would seem that the question of "is it an original studio record or a reconstruction from a lossy encoded data" is by far the more likely question to address with some kind of automatic detection approach.

It seems much less likely that automatic detection could reliably determine whether live recordings have been put through a lossy compression, as you don't have the same assumed reference point as a studio album (for which you can assume a full range of frequencies, no artifacts, etc).

That is, live recordings might have been made using a variety of equipment, and affected by the mics, equipment, etc. in ways that you don't see in a studio recording. Also, anything taped from any kind of broadcast would seem a challenge to automatically detect. For example, FM does not compress the audio, but it does strip out high frequencies.

And of course any live music originally recorded using mini disc.

Links:
Analyzer theory

This post has been edited by buzzy: Dec 14 2004, 15:07
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Jojo
post Dec 15 2004, 15:21
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I just tried to get to work on Windows 2000 SP4 and got a message that some libraries couldn't be found...


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sacriste
post Dec 15 2004, 21:40
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QUOTE (Jojo @ Dec 15 2004, 10:21 AM)
I just tried to get to work on Windows 2000 SP4 and got a message that some libraries couldn't be found...
*


It's so sad nobody answered you before (man, is one month), that's why I love Head-Fi PEOPLE... Anyway, just download those libraries from the Microsoft site (write down the name, make a search, etc). I did in two different PCs and works fine in one of them. Good luck! And, please, don´t ask me what I'm doin here or go to Head-Fi, try to be nicer instead... sad.gif
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Digga
post Dec 16 2004, 08:26
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QUOTE (sacriste @ Dec 15 2004, 09:40 PM)
It's so sad nobody answered you before (man, is one month), that's why I love Head-Fi PEOPLE...
I don't think there is a need to mention head-fi.org in every post... certainly not if your wild claims are... wild? (one month? WTF?) but that may be just my personal opinion.
QUOTE
And, please, don´t ask me what I'm doin here or go to Head-Fi, try to be nicer instead...
yeah... whatever. SPAM? spam.
ah, it's late. don't feed the spammers.


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Nothing but a Heartache - Since I found my Baby ;)
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RainDawg
post Dec 16 2004, 15:44
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Can you give some more details of how well this thing actually works. I remember running v0.7 through a battery of tests from MD sources through MP3 sources through live SBD recordings, etc...and getting some very sketchy results from this.

So, other than studio CDs, is this program useful for testing the mp3-lessness of certain live or FM recordings. I live music trading is where a program like this would be the most useful.
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Jojo
post Dec 16 2004, 17:28
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QUOTE (sacriste @ Dec 15 2004, 12:40 PM)
Anyway, just download those libraries from the Microsoft site (write down the name, make a search, etc). I did in two different PCs and works fine in one of them.
*

well, I could probably do that, but the issue remains. And I'm not using some old OS like Win 98 or ME...I'm using Win 2000 so the author should investigate this problem...


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--alt-presets are there for a reason! These other switches DO NOT work better than it, trust me on this.
LAME + Joint Stereo doesn't destroy 'Stereo'
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DigitalMan
post Dec 16 2004, 18:02
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My question is why would you want/need to determine the source of the recording? Per the Tru-Audio site the answer given is:
QUOTE
It is no secret that the Internet and file-exchanging networks are literally overloaded with music. The plenty of various formats which compress music files just favors this situation. Files in formats with lossy encoding and the highest degree of compression, like MP3, have got the greatest prevalence. While playing such files using cheap acoustic systems one can hardly distinguish their dissimilarity from the original ones, but all the distortions become evident while listening such disks on a Hi-Fi systems or using stereo headphones, especially if one has an opportunity to compare a record with its original. That is why when purchasing traditional audio CDs with music a question naturally arises whether this or that record is an authentic one or just a fake made by somebody who has just downloaded lossy encoded records from the Internet and recorded them to the blank CDs under the guise of a solid studios.


Hmm, an answer to a question I never thought to ask.


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RainDawg
post Dec 16 2004, 18:47
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The reason I would want to know the source has to do with the swapping of certain unofficial recordings that only circulate amongst fans. Many have understood the responsibility they have to the trading community, and have diligently performed lossless only transfers when sending this material to others. Some fans, however, have not been so kind, and have tainted the trasing pool with various lossy-sourced material and passed it off as the real thing.

A program that can reliably confirm my suspicion that a certain recording was indeed compressed to mp3 can help me remove it from the trading pool and hopefully support lossless only.

I am not afraid of potentially copied CDs, much less ones that have been generated from lossy sources....I think that's a bit of an extreme fear, and certainly not as prevalent as the need to track unofficial recordings.
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Dimension
post Jan 8 2005, 11:12
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This program is extremely irritating. I tried to use it to analyze some WAVs I extracted from a CD-R. I wanted to know if they were a copy of a CD or had just been burned from MP3s.

I downloaded and installed the program, but it has absolutely no controls other than selecting your drive letter, read/eject/analyze/stop and drop down "mode" box that allows you to select 1-8 with no explanation. So, I had to re-burn the WAVs to test, then as soon as I selected my CD-RW drive it crashed XP. That's pretty impressive as I have not had a single crash of XP since I installed SP2 months ago, but it crashed and the process could not be ended. It crashed Explorer, and when I tried to end the process several times it crashed the Task Manager. After several reboots I figured out that it just didn't like my CD-RW, so I tried the disc in my DVD-RW. Well, the analyzing worked just fine but what did it do? Hell if I know.

It has a "Spectrum" picture that's all orange and a "Frequency" graph that's just a couple curves, but it doesn't tell me anything at all. It doesn't even tell you which track it's showing you in the spectrum display, and it doesn't let you select which track you're analyzing, so who knows what it's doing. There's a little bit of banding in the frequency range; is this perhaps because it was a high-bitrate MP3? Next to the track it says "CDDA" in the Status column. Is this supposed to mean that it thinks it's a legit CD? If you dig through the help file it seems like this may be what they are talking about seeing as they make a reference to "Original CDDA Tracks." It really makes no sense, though, because CDDA (just another name for Red Book) is the only thing the program will accept, and the whole point is to determine if the CDDA was created from an MP3 source.

After reading all the help I did finally see that "mode" is actually the speed setting. I think "MODE 1/1" is slowest and "MODE 1/8" is the fastest, which is pretty strange... "SPEED 1X" and "SPEED 8X" would make a little more sense.

If the "CDDA" means it thinks it's legit, then it doesn't give you any sort of certainty. I mean, where does it draw the line? If it has to detect X amount of artifacts to say something is fake, wouldn't it be nice to know if your fake CD is X+1 artifacts or if your legit CD is X-1 artifacts?


[edit]
I guess I'm being a bit rude. I was annoyed that it kept completely freezing my machine, has no option to analyze a WAV without re-burning it to an audio CD, is somewhat lacking in documentation and gives no details about the conclusion it arrives at. It's not like I paid for it, so no big deal.

This post has been edited by Dimension: Jan 9 2005, 08:41
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rsadix
post Jan 18 2005, 01:24
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I just downloaded this program to see what it was about. A friend of mine gives me discs all the time and is never clear about what the source is.

Insert disc, click the analyse button and after a few minutes - status is mpeg. So yep these are files that he burned to cd from mp3's he downloaded. Solves that question.

So Dimension, if it says CDDA, then yes it seems to be telling you its original and not from an mp3 file. What more do you want? Both the frequency and Spectrum tabs are informative to me, they show sharp cutoffs at 16,000 Hz which is typical for mp3 files which predominately go through a lowpass filter.

Too bad the shareware version only analyzes the first two tracks. When the disc is a compilation I'd like to know the deal on all the tracks, but for shareware its worth every penny. At least I'm not APSing mp3->wav files.
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