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Other Dumbass Question
krsna77
post Oct 26 2001, 17:37
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Ok, here goes.

Clipping, being a problem with MP3 decoding, would often require normalization beforehand to compensate. For me, determining the proper normalization amount was often a degree of guesswork.

Then, MP3Gain came out. Problem solved.

I was wondering, is there a quantified amount, or formula, that each codec tends to increase levels by, and... if so, what is that value for Ogg Vorbis (and MPC, while we're at it)?

Reason I ask - if I encode to ogg, I would like to know the proper safe-but-sane normalization level geared for ogg. If it's not easily quantifyable beforehand, then at least is there a good method to detect and measure clips in ogg samples, so I can calculate the proper normalization amount myself to eliminate clipping for those tracks?

While I'm on it, will OGG / MPC ever have ReplayGain functionality, or something similar?
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Garf
post Oct 26 2001, 20:55
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QUOTE
Originally posted by krsna77

I have a tendency to believe you, however, I can think of one specific example (Alice in Chains - Dirt), that does clip very terribly, with nasty distortion, in OGG and MP3, until I normalize at ~0.84 (for MP3 - tho I use this value for OGG, its threshold may in fact be higher). Then it sounds fine (of course, I think this album really is pushed to the very limits).


Can you make a sample available? I would like to look at it.

QUOTE

Know of any good apps that can count clipped samples, so I can visually compare with what my ears are telling me?...


Sound Forge and probably Cool Edit can do this.

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