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GUI vs Command line
eshankumargupta
post Mar 4 2014, 15:21
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What is GUI and what is command line?
can anyone explain without the jargon.
i have been trying to read about tagging flac files and that is where i came across these two terms.

people have been recommending Mp3Tag for GUI and metaflac for commandline.

can anyone tell me what do they stand for and which of the two is better?
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includemeout
post Mar 4 2014, 15:30
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Assuming you refer to the very basics, (GUI stands for graphical user interface BTW) here's a link that may help, whether we're talking about audio encoders or not:

http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E19683-01/806-76...8447/index.html


The bottom line:

-GUI is usually less scary to non-technical users but its customization level goes as far as the developer thought it adequate to this same end user;
-the command line prompt for a given program on the other hand, offers all the customization there is to it - as long as the user is familiar with the its parameters, that is.

I hope this helps.

This post has been edited by includemeout: Mar 4 2014, 15:31


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eshankumargupta
post Mar 4 2014, 17:10
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thanks for the prompt reply.
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includemeout
post Mar 4 2014, 18:50
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QUOTE (eshankumargupta @ Mar 4 2014, 13:10) *
thanks for the prompt reply.


No problemo. I hope it helped you, in the end.


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AliceWonder
post Mar 23 2014, 01:02
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It's easier to make mistakes with the commandline.

For example I tagged a bunch of files using DISKNUMBER=n instead of DISCNUMBER=n resulting in improper sort. A GUI (hopefully) would have had a field for DISCNUMBER and I would not have mispelled the tag.

That being said, I use metaflac for all my flac tagging, the mistakes are easy to fix.
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Porcus
post Mar 23 2014, 17:18
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QUOTE (eshankumargupta @ Mar 4 2014, 15:21) *
people have been recommending Mp3Tag for GUI and metaflac for commandline.

can anyone tell me what do they stand for and which of the two is better?


I guess the answer you are looking for, is that from a typical end-user's point of view, they give precisely the same results. A GUI could very well be a graphical front-end that behind the scenes use the command-line. Novices would often think it is easier to point and click (but an application that calls another application, would be much better off telling it to do something, than moving the mouse and clicking it).

(The "typical" reservation: it might be - I don't know! - that e.g. MP3Tag does not utilize all the possible ways metaflac can manipulate. But if that matters, then you are not a "typical" end-user :-) )


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collector
post Apr 13 2014, 13:18
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QUOTE (AliceWonder @ Mar 22 2014, 16:02) *
It's easier to make mistakes with the commandline.
That being said, I use metaflac for all my flac tagging, the mistakes are easy to fix.

Once the syntax is right, you can use it forever without having to click and or make the same choices again. Most of my favorite commandline commands are in the history of my file manager. As there are batchfiles made of several command also in that history.
Choose the directory, start the batch file and yes, job done

I like using batch files and command lines, but hey, I started with dos 3,0 and command prompts in my early days..
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