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Verify that hires lossless files aren't just upsampled CDA
Anakunda
post Jan 27 2014, 20:44
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HI!!
I need some advice how to distinguish if 24-bit lossless files aren't just upsampled CD-Audio.
Recommended tool or guide for studying spectral graphs would be highly appreciated.
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DVDdoug
post Jan 27 2014, 21:20
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Since you can't tell by listening, what does it matter?

There are some clues, but there is no way to know for sure, and it can be faked.

In theory, I should be easy to check if the bottom 8-bits contain zeros, but I don't know of a tool that checks that. If there are zeros in the bottom 8-bits, you can be sure it was upsampled. (Or, it could have been recorded in 24-bits from using a 16-bit ADC.)

QUOTE
I need some advice how to distinguish if 24-bit lossless files aren't just upsampled CD-Audio.
If you have FLAC or ALAC, a "fake" 24-bit file should compress to (about) the same size as a compressed CD. (~6-7 MB per minute).

QUOTE
Recommended tool or guide for studying spectral graphs would be highly appreciated.
The spectrum (frequency content) is NOT related to bit depth. It's related to the sample rate.

The simplest explanation is that in order to represent a "wave", you need at least one sample-point for the top-half of the wave and one sample-point for the bottom half of the wave. That means 44.1kHz CD audio simply cannot have audio greater than 22,050Hz. If you have audio above 22,050Hz, and you are sure it's not a measurement or conversion artifact, then your true sample rate is above 44.1kHz.

However, just because there is no audio above 22,050Hz, that does NOT mean it's been upsampled. There are plenty of places in the recording & production chain where ultrasonics may be filtered-out. (And it's a good idea to do so, because you generally shouldn't waste bits, bandwidth, or headroom on stuff you can't hear.)

It would be easy to "fake" the bit depth... Reducing the volume by 0.1dB would probably introduce enough rounding error to fill-in the bottom 8-bits with data. Converting to MP3 and back (with a 24-bit decoder) should accomplish the same thing.

Or if you upsample both the sample rate and the bit depth, (say from 16/44.1 to 24/96) you will fill the 8 bottom bits with interpolated values and you'll never know.

It's a bit trickier, but it's also possible to add harmonics and/or noise to "fake" a higher original sample rate. i.e. Some people claim you need high sample rates to encode vinyl, but you are just encoding ultrasonic noise & distrotion that "looks good" on the spectrum .

This post has been edited by DVDdoug: Jan 27 2014, 21:43
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