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Ripping Music DVDs to hard drive, best ripping suite to use
Madgingertom
post Jul 20 2013, 14:44
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Having recently built a dedicated music/video music media player, I have sorted out the cd side, using dBpoweramp for ripping and Foobar 2000 for playback etc, I now need some advise on which video ripping suite to use ?.I have experimented with some free ripping suites but they seem to struggle with music videos that have a lot of interaction content on them ( Iron Maiden, Rammestein ) as an example, omitting sections. I dont mind paying for a descent ripping suite, I just want to archive them to hard drive successfully for playback through my HiFi. I would appreciate some suggestions and advise. Also could you suggest a playback suite for the ripped files.
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DVDdoug
post Jul 20 2013, 20:56
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Commercial DVDs are copy protected. In most countries it's illegal to crack the copy protection and we don't discuss that here.


You'll have to continue your own search for DVD ripping software. (There are a few websites that specialize in that kind of information.)

As far as I know, it's not illegal to plug the analog audio output from your DVD player into line-in on your soundcard, and make an "analog" copy.

If you can't find a single application to extract the audio, you may need to use a DVD ripping application to make a decrypted copy of the DVD files (the VIDEO_TS folder) to your hard drive, another program to create a single audio/video file, and a 3rd program to extract the audio. (Audacity is free, and with the optional FFMPEG Import/Export library, it can usually extract the audio from an A/V file.)

For non-encrypted DVDs, I can use Corel Video Studio ($100 USD) to extract the audio & make WAV files.

QUOTE
Also could you suggest a playback suite for the ripped files.
Once you extract your file, you can save it as WAV, MP3, AAC, etc. Then, you can play it any audio-player/media-player application (Windows Media Player, etc.).

This post has been edited by DVDdoug: Jul 20 2013, 20:59
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slks
post Aug 6 2013, 08:46
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QUOTE (DVDdoug @ Jul 20 2013, 14:56) *
As far as I know, it's not illegal to plug the analog audio output from your DVD player into line-in on your soundcard, and make an "analog" copy.


I'm no expert on the relevant laws, which vary by country, but that sounds awfully like circumventing copy protection to make an unauthorized copy! I could be mistaken but from my understanding the wording of the DMCA is broad enough to illegalize this.


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aztec_mystic
post Aug 6 2013, 09:55
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QUOTE (slks @ Aug 6 2013, 09:46) *
I'm no expert on the relevant laws, which vary by country, but that sounds awfully like circumventing copy protection to make an unauthorized copy!

Why would you hypothesize that? Most copy protection methods aren't designed to protect against analog copies. Hence the terms "digital rights management" and "analog hole."

IANAL, but I would be surprised if analog copying was criminalized under the DMCA or related laws.
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DVDdoug
post Aug 6 2013, 17:35
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QUOTE
I'm no expert on the relevant laws, which vary by country, but that sounds awfully like circumventing copy protection to make an unauthorized copy!
There is a copyright, but no copy protection on the analog audio output, so you are not circumventing anything. (There is copy protection on the analog video output.)
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AllanD
post Sep 12 2013, 19:50
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Though I haven't used any recent version of the program there was a trial version (downloaded from CNET Downloads)
of a program called "DVD Audio Extractor" that I used several years ago to extract the audio (as wav) from some concert DVD's

These DVD's were companion DVD's to audio CD's of the same concert and my "issue" was with the editing the studio originally used

The Music CD has a run time of 80min (more or less) while the DVD with it's two hour run time simply didn't require editing.

So what wound up "on the cutting room floor" were the introductions, conversation between band members on stage and between the singer
and the audience and typically two or more songs (often cover versions originally by other artists) perceived as "less popular"
(Metallica's S&M has a somewhat different feeling in the DVD version VS the CD version)

In any event I wanted to listen to those tracks while mobile...

The version available at the time had a somewhat clunky user interface but it was reasonably direct in it's function
The neat thing was that it would typically break up a DVD into separate audio tracks even if doing so was not available
as a menu item on the DVD, which saved quit a bit of tedious work "splitting" tracks into individual files.

at the time my issues with the user interface made it unjustifiable to continue using it past the 30day trial
(it stops working after 30 days) and I've been busy, so I haven't tried the more recent version.

I don't know if a direct link to the software download at CNET is allowed so I didn't post it, but knowing it's on CNET
along with the name in quotes above should get you there

This post has been edited by AllanD: Sep 12 2013, 19:51
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