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Listen vinyls throught PC
manosspan
post Apr 21 2013, 22:42
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Hello all!!!


Last week I started collecting vinyls (classical music most) for hobby. have a technics vinyl player without amplifier. I would like of there is way to hear my vinyls thought my pc because I have a very good 5,1 system. Is there any program that amplifies the signal and does also the riaa equalization?

Thank you
Manosspan
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Apesbrain
post Apr 22 2013, 00:26
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Newest release of VinylStudio has software RIAA equalization. Program is primarily for transferring LP to digital, but should work as a "player" as well.
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AndyH-ha
post Apr 22 2013, 02:06
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Unless the TT is one with a USB interface containing its own preamp, you are unlikely to get very satisfactory results. The output of a phono cartridge is a rather small signal that must be amplified quite a bit to be useful. A microphone input could have enough gain but it will not load the cartridge properly to sound right and any built-in microphone preamp is likely to be too noisy.

That all said, the MB microphone preamp is your only choice without additional hardware. It can't hurt to try it and see how it sounds to you. Freeware applications such as Audacity should be able to amplify the input signal enough to make it audible but I don't know that Audacity can work in real time. You may have to record first, then amplify and listen.

If the MB microphone preamp has variable gain, you should experiment to find the best setting. First the input signal needs to be amplified by the microphone preamp, then by the program. As you turn up the preamp gain, you will also be increasing the preamp noise, so you have to balance one against the other.

The more reasonable things is to obtain a phone preamp to go between the TT and the soundcard. Then use the line-in jack, not the microphone-in. This will probably produce a cleaner signal and it will have the proper equalization. If need-be, you can still record and program amplify before playback, but, depending on the system audio control panel, you may be able to listen in real time.
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kraut
post Apr 22 2013, 02:53
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QUOTE (manosspan @ Apr 21 2013, 14:42) *
Hello all!!!


Last week I started collecting vinyls (classical music most) for hobby. have a technics vinyl player without amplifier. I would like of there is way to hear my vinyls thought my pc because I have a very good 5,1 system. Is there any program that amplifies the signal and does also the riaa equalization?

Thank you
Manosspan


You likely need a phono preamp, amplification depends on the cartridge you have.
The only input that might work stereo mic input, check your cartridge output and the most sensitive PC input.
If that will work, you can run the input through foobar and apply foobar RIAA ilter - part of the DSP package that comes with foobar.
Phono preamps have build in RIAA filter and are available from Art, Behringer etc, competent and inexpensive.
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DVDdoug
post Apr 22 2013, 18:35
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The signal is too weak for a line-level input, and it's a bad idea to connect your phono cartridge to your computer's microphone input, for two (or 3) reasons... The mic input puts-out 5 Volts DC to power an electret condenser mic. You don't want to put that 5V power into your phono cartridge.

Phono cartridges are designed for a 47k Ohm load but mic inputs are typically around 5 - 10K. This will lower the signal and alter the frequency response.

And, some mic inputs are mono.

So, get a proper phono preamp (which will have the proper gain, impedance, and RIAA EQ) and plug it into your soundcard's line-input. (Most laptops don't have line-in, but if you have 5.1, I assume you have a desktop computer with line-input.)

If you don't have a line input, there are phono-to-USB devices, or in expensive USB interfaces with line iputs.
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kraut
post Apr 22 2013, 20:41
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QUOTE
The signal is too weak for a line-level input, and it's a bad idea to connect your phono cartridge to your computer's microphone input, for two (or 3) reasons... The mic input puts-out 5 Volts DC to power an electret condenser mic



Not necessaryly. I have a m-audio soundcard that does not supply phantom power. The impedance might be an issue. Of course I thought it understood we are talking stereo input.
But i agree - the best is a proper phono preamp, afaik the art and behringer have USB output.
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polemon
post Jun 5 2013, 04:53
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If you have some skill with dealing with electronics, like soldering etc., you can easily build a RIAA normalizer yourself. Maybe you have a friend that is electronically inclined, you could ask them to build one for you.

It's basically all passive components, it can be powered from a USB power source or an external power supply. No problems there. You can also make one with a micro controller, if you know someone that does this kind of thing.

The 2nd hand vinyl shop I visit from time to time, also does record player repairs and sells things like carbon brushes, slip mats and RIAA normalizers. They cost around 40 to 50 Euros, which I think is way too much.

I've built four of them by now. The first one was pretty bad, but the later ones were better. I sold two of them.


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Porcus
post Jun 10 2013, 17:50
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QUOTE (polemon @ Jun 5 2013, 05:53) *
If you have some skill with dealing with electronics, like soldering etc., you can easily build a RIAA normalizer yourself. Maybe you have a friend that is electronically inclined, you could ask them to build one for you.

It's basically all passive components, it can be powered from a USB power source or an external power supply



If you do not do the amplification part, is there then any reason not to use the sound card's line-in and then a software EQ?


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pdq
post Jun 10 2013, 18:21
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QUOTE (polemon @ Jun 4 2013, 23:53) *
It's basically all passive components, it can be powered from a USB power source or an external power supply.

Why would passive components need a power supply?
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