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Pinholes in the metallic layer of a CD no longer contain music, Split from Topic ID #96812 (TOS #5)
greynol
post Sep 9 2012, 03:19
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Yawn.

http://www.hydrogenaudio.org/forums/index....st&p=407445

PS: If you can't recover error-free data from a disc, you might consider blaming your drive instead of pretending to know how data is written on a disc.

This post has been edited by greynol: Sep 9 2012, 03:22


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jayess
post Sep 9 2012, 03:24
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QUOTE (greynol @ Sep 8 2012, 21:19) *
Yawn.

http://www.hydrogenaudio.org/forums/index....st&p=407445

PS: If you can't recover error-free data from a disc, you might consider blaming your drive instead of pretending to know how data is written on a disc.


"Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. Please search for CIRC) in Wikipedia to check for alternative titles or spellings."

Snore...
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greynol
post Sep 9 2012, 03:26
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Common sense would suggest you remove the unnecessary closed parenthesis...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CIRC

See that that wasn't right and then try some disambiguation...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CIRC_%28disambiguation%29

...and then choose the one that you've been told.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cross-interle...-Solomon_coding

Of course it's much easier to pretend that there isn't some article out there that actually addresses the point you're afraid to concede.

This post has been edited by greynol: Sep 9 2012, 03:29


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jayess
post Sep 9 2012, 03:27
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QUOTE (greynol @ Sep 8 2012, 21:19) *
Yawn.

http://www.hydrogenaudio.org/forums/index....st&p=407445

PS: If you can't recover error-free data from a disc, you might consider blaming your drive instead of pretending to know how data is written on a disc.


All well and good, but I'm still waiting to see a video of someone drilling holes in a disc and then ripping the data.
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mjb2006
post Sep 9 2012, 06:52
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jayess, I will try to explain, although you really could just read about CIRC elsewhere, as has been suggested multiple times.

The audio samples on the CD aren't written "raw" and sequentially into the pits and lands. If they were, then you'd be right to assume any unreadable spot, be it due to a pinhole or not, would likely be an unrecoverable loss. But in reality, before being turned into pits and lands, the samples are interleaved with other info (timecode, secondary data streams, sync data), so it's not even guaranteed that every pinhole is necessarily "on a sample".

On top of that, and more importantly, all this data is further subjected to CIRC coding, which bloats the data slightly to add some checksum-like codes (to oversimplify a little), and shuffles everything kind of like a deck of cards. The bits for a given sample are thus spread out over a wide area; they're not concentrated in a single spot. The result is that there can be random, occasional tiny errors, as well as completely unreadable bursts of pits and lands, even a straight-up gap of over 2 millimeters, and yet the original info encoded therein can be fully recovered through some virtual sudoku, 100% accurately.

Sure, larger or more frequent holes may exceed the error correction capability of CIRC and result in some undecodable samples. But usually, a significant scratch won't affect a continuous span of samples; rather, it will affect single samples spaced somewhat far apart. In a real CD player, these samples can usually be easily interpolated (e.g. as being halfway between adjacent, undamaged samples) and the result may not be 100% correct, but will be audibly indistinguishable from error-free data. Only when samples can't be interpolated, in the most severe cases, do you get audible glitches during playback. In a CD drive, during DAE (ripping), interpolation isn't normally attempted, so it's quite possible for a lightly damaged disc to play just fine but not rip error-free. "Secure" ripping software can compensate for this, to a degree, with various re-reading strategies.

There's more to know, but hopefully this helps you understand why you shouldn't consider pinholes to be a major threat to the integrity of the music encoded on the disc.

This post has been edited by mjb2006: Sep 9 2012, 06:59
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[JAZ]
post Sep 9 2012, 12:26
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Yup. Not to mention the user-error in mentioning Wasabi (Winamp 3/5 API for skins and new plugins) versus WASAPI (Audio API in Windows Vista/7/8).



He insists on mentioning an extreme case (which can happen, I had an old Data CD damaged by a young nephew of mine, when he tried to "draw" with a pen on the label side and made several lines where one could see through).
"pin holes visible when looking to a light" compared to this is minimal.

This post has been edited by [JAZ]: Sep 9 2012, 12:26
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jayess
post Sep 9 2012, 13:55
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QUOTE (mjb2006 @ Sep 9 2012, 00:52) *
jayess, I will try to explain, although you really could just read about CIRC elsewhere, as has been suggested multiple times.

The audio samples on the CD aren't written "raw" and sequentially into the pits and lands. If they were, then you'd be right to assume any unreadable spot, be it due to a pinhole or not, would likely be an unrecoverable loss. But in reality, before being turned into pits and lands, the samples are interleaved with other info (timecode, secondary data streams, sync data), so it's not even guaranteed that every pinhole is necessarily "on a sample".

On top of that, and more importantly, all this data is further subjected to CIRC coding, which bloats the data slightly to add some checksum-like codes (to oversimplify a little), and shuffles everything kind of like a deck of cards. The bits for a given sample are thus spread out over a wide area; they're not concentrated in a single spot. The result is that there can be random, occasional tiny errors, as well as completely unreadable bursts of pits and lands, even a straight-up gap of over 2 millimeters, and yet the original info encoded therein can be fully recovered through some virtual sudoku, 100% accurately.

Sure, larger or more frequent holes may exceed the error correction capability of CIRC and result in some undecodable samples. But usually, a significant scratch won't affect a continuous span of samples; rather, it will affect single samples spaced somewhat far apart. In a real CD player, these samples can usually be easily interpolated (e.g. as being halfway between adjacent, undamaged samples) and the result may not be 100% correct, but will be audibly indistinguishable from error-free data. Only when samples can't be interpolated, in the most severe cases, do you get audible glitches during playback. In a CD drive, during DAE (ripping), interpolation isn't normally attempted, so it's quite possible for a lightly damaged disc to play just fine but not rip error-free. "Secure" ripping software can compensate for this, to a degree, with various re-reading strategies.

There's more to know, but hopefully this helps you understand why you shouldn't consider pinholes to be a major threat to the integrity of the music encoded on the disc.


so it's quite possible for a lightly damaged disc to play just fine but not rip error-free.

That's what I've been saying all along and it seems to keep drawing disagreement for some reason. If you don't buy used discs with scratches or pinholes, there is no problem ripping them.

There is a couple of good vids on CD error correction:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gHRR-8Q2DHE

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gHRR-8Q2DHE

I still standby my point that while a player can correct (quiet) these errors during playback of music, it frequently can't correct the data to make perfect rips that match Accuraterip.
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Porcus
post Sep 9 2012, 14:07
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QUOTE (jayess @ Sep 9 2012, 14:55) *
so it's quite possible for a lightly damaged disc to play just fine but not rip error-free.


It is also quite possible for a damaged disc – so damaged that quite a few physical pits are completely destroyed – to not only play just fine, but to rip error free, to precisely the same bitstream as a pristine copy of the same disc.


QUOTE (jayess @ Sep 9 2012, 14:55) *
I still standby my point that while a player can correct (quiet) these errors during playback of music, it frequently can't correct the data to make perfect rips that match Accuraterip.


You still seem to think that “correct” = “quiet”? It isn't.
– Interpolating an error is done to make it less annoying, less audible, or at best, less likely to be audible.
– Correcting an error means that bit(s) on the CD are wrong, yet the rip is perfect in the sense that it would match any comparison of the resulting files with ones read from a pristine disc.


This is the difference between “you are wrong, so STFU”, and “you are wrong, here's the fix, now you are right”. A CD has information to do the latter, but only to a certain extent. Kinda like this thread, I'd say.


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jayess
post Sep 9 2012, 15:17
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QUOTE (Porcus @ Sep 9 2012, 08:07) *
QUOTE (jayess @ Sep 9 2012, 14:55) *
so it's quite possible for a lightly damaged disc to play just fine but not rip error-free.


It is also quite possible for a damaged disc – so damaged that quite a few physical pits are completely destroyed – to not only play just fine, but to rip error free, to precisely the same bitstream as a pristine copy of the same disc.


QUOTE (jayess @ Sep 9 2012, 14:55) *
I still standby my point that while a player can correct (quiet) these errors during playback of music, it frequently can't correct the data to make perfect rips that match Accuraterip.


You still seem to think that “correct” = “quiet”? It isn't.
– Interpolating an error is done to make it less annoying, less audible, or at best, less likely to be audible.
– Correcting an error means that bit(s) on the CD are wrong, yet the rip is perfect in the sense that it would match any comparison of the resulting files with ones read from a pristine disc.


This is the difference between “you are wrong, so STFU”, and “you are wrong, here's the fix, now you are right”. A CD has information to do the latter, but only to a certain extent. Kinda like this thread, I'd say.


I'm going to post some tests I'm doing right now when I finish in a new thread, so the pictures and data isn't buried from people seeing it. But basically, I put two identical copes of an old, chrome top, Elton John CD on a scanner to show the holes, and then I'm going to rip both copies with three different drives and post the results and pictures.
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[JAZ]
post Sep 9 2012, 17:09
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As for your images and results posted in here : http://www.hydrogenaudio.org/forums/index....showtopic=96900

1) Why do, both discs, have holes in almost the same positions? (Concretely, top part. Is that a consequence of the scanner not being clean?)
2) Do you realize that they are different pressings? (At least, different discs).
3) With two of the drives, you get good AR results with CD1 but not with CD2, and the third drive reports failure with both discs.

It would be interesting to find out what is the difference. Take the same ripped track from each CD and verify if the content is different as a whole, or just different in some places. (I'm not sure what to recommend for this, HEX editor with fc /b , audio editor and invert signal... Both have its pros and cons)

If it is really on very concrete parts of the track, then we could determine it's a rip failure. Else, it's obviously not a failure in ripping but something else.
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mjb2006
post Sep 9 2012, 17:34
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OK, but if a particular disc/drive/ripper/rip-option combo has trouble with a disc that has only pinholes (no other dust or scratches), how do you know it was the pinholes? What makes a disc unreadable isn't necessarily visible to the eye, and isn't even necessarily indicative of a fault on the disc; different drives handle different types of defects better than others.

I have a CD here (made by Discovery Systems) that has no pinholes or scratches; it looks absolutely pristine, but has some kind of manufacturing defect (I can only assume) which make most of its tracks unreadable in any drive or player. If it somehow acquires some pinholes down the line, I'd obviously be mistaken if I attributed the disc's problems to them.

And as has been stated, pinhole-laden discs sometimes do rip without error. I have one like this, myself. So even without understanding the details of the CDDA format and its error-correction capabilities, it's clearly a mistake to assume that pinholes guarantee a disc contains "holes in the music" or that it won't rip and play 100% error-free.

If you have a choice between getting a disc with pinholes and getting one without, then surely, why take the risk with the pinholes? Nobody is saying otherwise. We're just saying you're wrong to assume pinholes guarantee problems.

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jayess
post Sep 9 2012, 17:34
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QUOTE ([JAZ] @ Sep 9 2012, 11:09) *

As for your images and results posted in here : http://www.hydrogenaudio.org/forums/index....showtopic=96900

1) Why do, both discs, have holes in almost the same positions? (Concretely, top part. Is that a consequence of the scanner not being clean?)
2) Do you realize that they are different pressings? (At least, different discs).
3) With two of the drives, you get good AR results with CD1 but not with CD2, and the third drive reports failure with both discs.

It would be interesting to find out what is the difference. Take the same ripped track from each CD and verify if the content is different as a whole, or just different in some places. (I'm not sure what to recommend for this, HEX editor with fc /b , audio editor and invert signal... Both have its pros and cons)

If it is really on very concrete parts of the track, then we could determine it's a rip failure. Else, it's obviously not a failure in ripping but something else.


I did clean the scanner with a damp LCD cloth and then a paint brush.

Both discs say they are "MCAD 6321"

But they do report a difference in the number along the opening:

MCAD-6321-5T by JVC for disc 1

MCAD-6321 A60524JB MFG by UNI on disc 2

I saved each rip folder with the disc number and drive; I'll play around with some track comparisons in Foobar.

An ugly question is if these discs are actually different and DBPoweramp can't differentiate that, then the Accuraterip numbers are what? Worthless?

This post has been edited by jayess: Sep 9 2012, 17:39
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jayess
post Sep 9 2012, 17:38
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QUOTE (mjb2006 @ Sep 9 2012, 11:34) *
OK, but if a particular disc/drive/ripper/rip-option combo has trouble with a disc that has only pinholes (no other dust or scratches), how do you know it was the pinholes? What makes a disc unreadable isn't necessarily visible to the eye, and isn't even necessarily indicative of a fault on the disc; different drives handle different types of defects better than others.

I have a CD here (made by Discovery Systems) that has no pinholes or scratches; it looks absolutely pristine, but has some kind of manufacturing defect (I can only assume) which make most of its tracks unreadable in any drive or player. If it somehow acquires some pinholes down the line, I'd obviously be mistaken if I attributed the disc's problems to them.

And as has been stated, pinhole-laden discs sometimes do rip without error. I have one like this, myself. So even without understanding the details of the CDDA format and its error-correction capabilities, it's clearly a mistake to assume that pinholes guarantee a disc contains "holes in the music" or that it won't rip and play 100% error-free.

If you have a choice between getting a disc with pinholes and getting one without, then surely, why take the risk with the pinholes? Nobody is saying otherwise. We're just saying you're wrong to assume pinholes guarantee problems.


A fair question at this point in regards to ripping accurately and without error is "to what degree?"

A disc with pinholes could give you a confidence of 5, but a truly perfect one would probably be much higher.

Both of these discs obviously have holes, but one is able to achieve a score of 4 and the other is a 1.
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EagleScout1998
post Sep 9 2012, 17:55
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QUOTE
A disc with pinholes could give you a confidence of 5, but a truly perfect one would probably be much higher.


That's not how confidence works. The confidence of 5 means that 5 other people ripped the exact same CD (same pressing) and got the exact same result.

Moreover, the new version of AccurateRip does recognize different pressings, as evidenced by your ripping log.

QUOTE
Track 1: Ripped LBA 37 to 24940 (5:32) in 1:21. Filename: F:\Elton John\Sleeping with the Past\01 Elton John - Durban Deep.wav
AccurateRip: Accurate (confidence 4) [Pass 1]
CRC32: 0E9887A1 AccurateRip CRC: C8D19798 (CRCv2) [DiscID: 010-0012b4fa-00948737-810b3c0a-1]
AccurateRip Verified Confidence 4 [CRCv2 c8d19798]
AccurateRip Verified Confidence 19 [CRCv1 9c42d4c7]
AccurateRip Verified Confidence 22 [CRCv1 ff5f40ca], Using Pressing Offset -278
AccurateRip Verified Confidence 12 [CRCv1 7c6c2fa3], Using Pressing Offset -685


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jayess
post Sep 9 2012, 18:03
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QUOTE (EagleScout1998 @ Sep 9 2012, 11:55) *
QUOTE
A disc with pinholes could give you a confidence of 5, but a truly perfect one would probably be much higher.


That's not how confidence works. The confidence of 5 means that 5 other people ripped the exact same CD (same pressing) and got the exact same result.

Moreover, the new version of AccurateRip does recognize different pressings, as evidenced by your ripping log.

QUOTE
Track 1: Ripped LBA 37 to 24940 (5:32) in 1:21. Filename: F:\Elton John\Sleeping with the Past\01 Elton John - Durban Deep.wav
AccurateRip: Accurate (confidence 4) [Pass 1]
CRC32: 0E9887A1 AccurateRip CRC: C8D19798 (CRCv2) [DiscID: 010-0012b4fa-00948737-810b3c0a-1]
AccurateRip Verified Confidence 4 [CRCv2 c8d19798]
AccurateRip Verified Confidence 19 [CRCv1 9c42d4c7]
AccurateRip Verified Confidence 22 [CRCv1 ff5f40ca], Using Pressing Offset -278
AccurateRip Verified Confidence 12 [CRCv1 7c6c2fa3], Using Pressing Offset -685



Ok, so what about when it says 5 other people got a 5, but 12 others didn't?

Again, if we have no way of knowing who had what pressing as we are seeing, what good is all this?

I generally make a decision to keep a disc that has the best numbers or seek a replacement for discs that have bad numbers.

And why isn't the "error correction" fixing all these bad rips?

And how do I know about all these different pressings and which are which without having all these different ones?

This stuff is a headache.

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EagleScout1998
post Sep 9 2012, 18:30
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I sense another thread split.....

Confidence numbers have nothing to do with the physical condition of the disc. A pristine disc can have the same confidence number as one with scratches. If you are using confidence numbers to judge which discs to keep and which to replace, then STOP! You are throwing your money away.

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greynol
post Sep 9 2012, 18:40
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I know it's cruel but this has got to be the funniest epic FAIL I've seen in a long time!


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jayess
post Sep 9 2012, 18:47
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QUOTE (greynol @ Sep 9 2012, 12:40) *
I know it's cruel but this has got to be the funniest epic FAIL I've seen in a long time!


Should we drill that hole now?
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greynol
post Sep 9 2012, 18:53
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Go right ahead.

Is it time to end this silly troll-fest yet?

This post has been edited by greynol: Sep 9 2012, 21:20


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jayess
post Sep 9 2012, 18:56
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QUOTE (greynol @ Sep 9 2012, 12:53) *
Go right ahead.

Is it time to end this silly troll-fest yet?


Well so far in our discussions you've resorted to name calling and now you're on the "troll fest" trip.

I think this stuff is pretty educational for people that are not as versed as some of the pros in here to show them the nuances of ripping music.
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greynol
post Sep 9 2012, 19:03
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The education never had to go farther than the very first reply to your post.

Regarding my insensitive, gross and brutal name calling, I'll let the readers judge for themselves. I gave up on appealing to your honesty and common sense several posts ago.


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jayess
post Sep 9 2012, 19:20
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QUOTE (greynol @ Sep 9 2012, 13:03) *
The education never had to go farther than the very first reply to your post.

Regarding my insensitive, gross and brutal name calling, I'll let the readers judge for themselves. I gave up on appealing to your honesty and common sense several posts ago.


Here's one for the road Greynol, not a scratch on this Jimmy Buffett CD...and I can rip it, but it sure ain't accurate! Or so it says.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/86975222@N06/.../in/photostream

http://www.flickr.com/photos/86975222@N06/.../in/photostream

Enjoy your Sunday!
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jayess
post Sep 10 2012, 00:36
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QUOTE (EagleScout1998 @ Sep 9 2012, 12:30) *
I sense another thread split.....

Confidence numbers have nothing to do with the physical condition of the disc. A pristine disc can have the same confidence number as one with scratches. If you are using confidence numbers to judge which discs to keep and which to replace, then STOP! You are throwing your money away.


I'm not sure I'm following your logic. If a disc scores basically a zero because it fails to match any other discs, then it basically has a quality problem, does it not? And scratches do not necessarily mean the disc cannot be accurately read, especially if they run from the inside out, versus following the track data path.

Wasting money isn't really an issue. I buy most of my CD's used and probably average $1 per disc, so I'm more concerned about having a good, accurate disc more than anything else. Even if you have to buy the same disc more than once to get a good one at $1 apiece, it's still a bargain over the new price. Of course in extreme cases on difficult to find, expensive discs, you can use select tracks off of each that had high rip scores to make a good copy.

Anyway, check out this wild ride on this good-looking disc.

CODE
dBpoweramp Release 14.2 Digital Audio Extraction Log from Sunday, September 09, 2012 02:50 PM

Drive & Settings
----------------

Ripping with drive 'E: [HP - DVD Writer 560r ]', Drive offset: 6, Overread Lead-in/out: No
AccurateRip: Active, Using C2: No, Cache: 1024 KB, FUA Cache Invalidate: No
Pass 1 Drive Speed: 10, Pass 2 Drive Speed: 10
Bad Sector Re-rip:: Drive Speed: 10, Maximum Re-reads: 34

Encoder: Wave -compression="PCM"

Extraction Log
--------------

Track 1: Ripped LBA 37 to 14897 (3:18) in 0:43. Filename: F:\Jimmy Buffett\Changes in Latitudes, Changes in Attitudes-Havana Daydreamin'\01 Jimmy Buffett - Changes in Latitudes, Changes in Attitudes.wav
AccurateRip: Accurate (confidence 3) [Pass 1]
CRC32: 8BFBA961 AccurateRip CRC: 89C22EA2 (CRCv2) [DiscID: 019-003376ce-02c7f7f5-0510b313-1]
AccurateRip Verified Confidence 3 [CRCv2 89c22ea2]
AccurateRip Verified Confidence 8 [CRCv1 a7fee69]

Track 2: Ripped LBA 14897 to 32312 (3:52) in 0:46. Filename: F:\Jimmy Buffett\Changes in Latitudes, Changes in Attitudes-Havana Daydreamin'\02 Jimmy Buffett - Wonder Why We Ever Go Home.wav
AccurateRip: Accurate (confidence 2) [Pass 1]
CRC32: 07C3F084 AccurateRip CRC: F81C40E1 (CRCv2) [DiscID: 019-003376ce-02c7f7f5-0510b313-2]
AccurateRip Verified Confidence 2 [CRCv2 f81c40e1]
AccurateRip Verified Confidence 8 [CRCv1 faf9d8a4]

Track 3: Ripped LBA 32312 to 55807 (5:13) in 0:57. Filename: F:\Jimmy Buffett\Changes in Latitudes, Changes in Attitudes-Havana Daydreamin'\03 Jimmy Buffett - Banana Republics.wav
AccurateRip: Accurate (confidence 2) [Pass 1]
CRC32: 937C9D6C AccurateRip CRC: 6BAAD552 (CRCv2) [DiscID: 019-003376ce-02c7f7f5-0510b313-3]
AccurateRip Verified Confidence 2 [CRCv2 6baad552]
AccurateRip Verified Confidence 8 [CRCv1 a0138975]

Track 4: Ripped LBA 55807 to 76660 (4:38) in 0:46. Filename: F:\Jimmy Buffett\Changes in Latitudes, Changes in Attitudes-Havana Daydreamin'\04 Jimmy Buffett - Tampico Trauma.wav
AccurateRip: Accurate (confidence 2) [Pass 1]
CRC32: A89641CF AccurateRip CRC: D2B3DE70 (CRCv2) [DiscID: 019-003376ce-02c7f7f5-0510b313-4]
AccurateRip Verified Confidence 2 [CRCv2 d2b3de70]
AccurateRip Verified Confidence 8 [CRCv1 e9b66725]

Track 5: Ripped LBA 76660 to 94352 (3:55) in 0:37. Filename: F:\Jimmy Buffett\Changes in Latitudes, Changes in Attitudes-Havana Daydreamin'\05 Jimmy Buffett - Lovely Cruise.wav
AccurateRip: Accurate (confidence 2) [Pass 1]
CRC32: 25505A1C AccurateRip CRC: D01BC61C (CRCv2) [DiscID: 019-003376ce-02c7f7f5-0510b313-5]
AccurateRip Verified Confidence 2 [CRCv2 d01bc61c]
AccurateRip Verified Confidence 8 [CRCv1 2d63dff6]

Track 6: Ripped LBA 94352 to 113170 (4:10) in 0:37. Filename: F:\Jimmy Buffett\Changes in Latitudes, Changes in Attitudes-Havana Daydreamin'\06 Jimmy Buffett - Margaritaville.wav
AccurateRip: Accurate (confidence 2) [Pass 1]
CRC32: 24379F6B AccurateRip CRC: EF81C8B0 (CRCv2) [DiscID: 019-003376ce-02c7f7f5-0510b313-6]
AccurateRip Verified Confidence 2 [CRCv2 ef81c8b0]
AccurateRip Verified Confidence 8 [CRCv1 d3f61b30]

Track 7: Ripped LBA 113170 to 129930 (3:43) in 0:31. Filename: F:\Jimmy Buffett\Changes in Latitudes, Changes in Attitudes-Havana Daydreamin'\07 Jimmy Buffett - Miss You So Badly.wav
AccurateRip: Accurate (confidence 2) [Pass 1]
CRC32: AB8E3C19 AccurateRip CRC: 6BC446F3 (CRCv2) [DiscID: 019-003376ce-02c7f7f5-0510b313-7]
AccurateRip Verified Confidence 2 [CRCv2 6bc446f3]
AccurateRip Verified Confidence 8 [CRCv1 99ec0891]

Track 8: Ripped LBA 129930 to 155430 (5:40) in 0:45. Filename: F:\Jimmy Buffett\Changes in Latitudes, Changes in Attitudes-Havana Daydreamin'\08 Jimmy Buffett - Biloxi.wav
AccurateRip: Accurate (confidence 2) [Pass 1]
CRC32: 67E464DF AccurateRip CRC: F5890647 (CRCv2) [DiscID: 019-003376ce-02c7f7f5-0510b313-8]
AccurateRip Verified Confidence 2 [CRCv2 f5890647]
AccurateRip Verified Confidence 8 [CRCv1 6c4db65a]

Track 9: Ripped LBA 155430 to 170365 (3:19) in 0:25. Filename: F:\Jimmy Buffett\Changes in Latitudes, Changes in Attitudes-Havana Daydreamin'\09 Jimmy Buffett - Landfall.wav
AccurateRip: Accurate (confidence 2) [Pass 1]
CRC32: 7D6C722D AccurateRip CRC: 742F997C (CRCv2) [DiscID: 019-003376ce-02c7f7f5-0510b313-9]
AccurateRip Verified Confidence 2 [CRCv2 742f997c]
AccurateRip Verified Confidence 8 [CRCv1 e117176e]

Track 10: Ripped LBA 170365 to 189137 (4:10) in 0:31. Filename: F:\Jimmy Buffett\Changes in Latitudes, Changes in Attitudes-Havana Daydreamin'\10 Jimmy Buffett - Woman Goin' Crazy on Caroline Street.wav
AccurateRip: Accurate (confidence 8) [Pass 1]
CRC32: 372A7168 AccurateRip CRC: 610BB901 [DiscID: 019-003376ce-02c7f7f5-0510b313-10]
AccurateRip Verified Confidence 8 [CRCv1 610bb901]

Track 11: Ripped LBA 189137 to 200805 (2:35) in 0:18. Filename: F:\Jimmy Buffett\Changes in Latitudes, Changes in Attitudes-Havana Daydreamin'\11 Jimmy Buffett - My Head Hurts, My Feet Stink and I Don't Love Jesus.wav
AccurateRip: Accurate (confidence 8) [Pass 1]
CRC32: ED2D2C18 AccurateRip CRC: 02B38C7F [DiscID: 019-003376ce-02c7f7f5-0510b313-11]
AccurateRip Verified Confidence 8 [CRCv1 2b38c7f]

Track 12: Ripped LBA 200805 to 215687 (3:18) in 0:23. Filename: F:\Jimmy Buffett\Changes in Latitudes, Changes in Attitudes-Havana Daydreamin'\12 Jimmy Buffett - The Captain and the Kid.wav
AccurateRip: Accurate (confidence 8) [Pass 1]
CRC32: 65ADC0F2 AccurateRip CRC: 4429587D [DiscID: 019-003376ce-02c7f7f5-0510b313-12]
AccurateRip Verified Confidence 8 [CRCv1 4429587d]

Track 13: Ripped LBA 215687 to 231547 (3:31) in 0:24. Filename: F:\Jimmy Buffett\Changes in Latitudes, Changes in Attitudes-Havana Daydreamin'\13 Jimmy Buffett - Big Rig.wav
AccurateRip: Accurate (confidence 8) [Pass 1]
CRC32: 85C32B43 AccurateRip CRC: B3D937A5 [DiscID: 019-003376ce-02c7f7f5-0510b313-13]
AccurateRip Verified Confidence 8 [CRCv1 b3d937a5]

Track 14: Ripped LBA 231547 to 243777 (2:43) in 0:18. Filename: F:\Jimmy Buffett\Changes in Latitudes, Changes in Attitudes-Havana Daydreamin'\14 Jimmy Buffett - Defying Gravity.wav
AccurateRip: Accurate (confidence 2) [Pass 1]
CRC32: 06F36C88 AccurateRip CRC: 1C6CCCA7 (CRCv2) [DiscID: 019-003376ce-02c7f7f5-0510b313-14]
AccurateRip Verified Confidence 2 [CRCv2 1c6ccca7]
AccurateRip Verified Confidence 8 [CRCv1 23d9e82c]

Track 15: Ripped LBA 243777 to 260255 (3:39) in 0:24. Filename: F:\Jimmy Buffett\Changes in Latitudes, Changes in Attitudes-Havana Daydreamin'\15 Jimmy Buffett - Havana Daydreamin'.wav
AccurateRip: Accurate (confidence 2) [Pass 1]
CRC32: 6ADDA8A5 AccurateRip CRC: 6584A7CD (CRCv2) [DiscID: 019-003376ce-02c7f7f5-0510b313-15]
AccurateRip Verified Confidence 2 [CRCv2 6584a7cd]
AccurateRip Verified Confidence 8 [CRCv1 7a6cd144]

Track 16: Ripped LBA 260255 to 272735 (2:46) in 0:17. Filename: F:\Jimmy Buffett\Changes in Latitudes, Changes in Attitudes-Havana Daydreamin'\16 Jimmy Buffett - Cliches.wav
AccurateRip: Accurate (confidence 8) [Pass 1]
CRC32: 653D5B1C AccurateRip CRC: 819C5210 [DiscID: 019-003376ce-02c7f7f5-0510b313-16]
AccurateRip Verified Confidence 8 [CRCv1 819c5210]

Track 17: Ripped LBA 272735 to 288705 (3:32) in 0:22. Filename: F:\Jimmy Buffett\Changes in Latitudes, Changes in Attitudes-Havana Daydreamin'\17 Jimmy Buffett - Something So Feminine About a Mandolin.wav
AccurateRip: Accurate (confidence 2) [Pass 1]
CRC32: A152B2C7 AccurateRip CRC: 89C471E0 (CRCv2) [DiscID: 019-003376ce-02c7f7f5-0510b313-17]
AccurateRip Verified Confidence 2 [CRCv2 89c471e0]
AccurateRip Verified Confidence 8 [CRCv1 808ae8d8]

Track 18: Ripped LBA 288705 to 306500 (3:57) in 0:24. Filename: F:\Jimmy Buffett\Changes in Latitudes, Changes in Attitudes-Havana Daydreamin'\18 Jimmy Buffett - Kick It in Second Wind.wav
AccurateRip: Accurate (confidence 8) [Pass 1]
CRC32: 4222328D AccurateRip CRC: C0FA48CB [DiscID: 019-003376ce-02c7f7f5-0510b313-18]
AccurateRip Verified Confidence 8 [CRCv1 c0fa48cb]

Track 19: Ripped LBA 306500 to 320642 (3:08) in 0:19. Filename: F:\Jimmy Buffett\Changes in Latitudes, Changes in Attitudes-Havana Daydreamin'\19 Jimmy Buffett - This Hotel Room.wav
AccurateRip: Accurate (confidence 2) [Pass 1]
CRC32: E5AEFFBD AccurateRip CRC: AB7DB4B3 (CRCv2) [DiscID: 019-003376ce-02c7f7f5-0510b313-19]
AccurateRip Verified Confidence 2 [CRCv2 ab7db4b3]
AccurateRip Verified Confidence 8 [CRCv1 15aa726]

--------------

19 Tracks Ripped Accurately


This post has been edited by db1989: Sep 10 2012, 00:55
Reason for edit: Please enclose large/gargantuan items within [codebox] tags.
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EagleScout1998
post Sep 10 2012, 00:48
Post #49





Group: Members
Posts: 275
Joined: 1-October 06
Member No.: 35820



QUOTE
If a disc scores basically a zero because it fails to match any other discs, then it basically has a quality problem, does it not?


Once again, the confidence numbers have ABSOLUTELY NOTHING to do with the physical condition of the CD. Nothing. Zip. Zilch. Nadda. Zero.

The confidence number are not "rip scores". They are specific to AccurateRip. It tells you that "x" number of people ripped the exact same CD and got the exact same result. That's it. A confidence number of 5 is every bit as reliable as a confidence number of 200.

If the disc does not have an AccurateRip match, it could mean that the disc has not yet been submitted to the AccurateRip database. If that's the case, then what you want is a Secure rip (indicated by a green check mark).

This post has been edited by EagleScout1998: Sep 10 2012, 01:00
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greynol
post Sep 10 2012, 06:26
Post #50





Group: Super Moderator
Posts: 10055
Joined: 1-April 04
From: San Francisco
Member No.: 13167



A confidence of 1 is just as reliable as a confidence of 200 provided that it wasn't you own previous submission.

If it was your submission than it is no less reliable an indicator than a successfully secure rip.

This post has been edited by greynol: Sep 10 2012, 06:28


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