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Recording of audio files on DVD, Moved from General Audio (TOS #6)
ggg
post Nov 25 2013, 12:02
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Hello, ppl
I have a simple question

What is the best speed for recording of mp3, wave & other music file types on DVD-R discs ?
I mean the best speed in order to have the best quality of the recorded audio data.
Usually i record with 2x speed, but at the moment i have a bulk of DVD-R discs Verbatim, which minimum speed is 4x

Is it worth to record on 4x, will i have problems with the quality of the record ?

10x
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probedb
post Nov 25 2013, 12:31
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Whatever speed you want. Just check the verify after burn option if you want to make sure it's ok.
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ggg
post Nov 25 2013, 13:15
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hmm, iam not sure

i think lower speed is always better for quality of record
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probedb
post Nov 25 2013, 13:46
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QUOTE (ggg @ Nov 25 2013, 12:15) *
hmm, iam not sure

i think lower speed is always better for quality of record


Then why did you ask since you've already decided on the answer?

It's data, it doesn't matter what speed you burnt it at or it wouldn't burn it at that speed. The only issue I remember from years back was that discs burnt at high speeds failed earlier....but that was many years ago. I've not had any issues burned at 16x and upwards.
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pdq
post Nov 25 2013, 13:54
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There are programs that will test the quality of a CD or DVD in terms of number of correctable and uncorrectable errors. One that I used years ago was by Nero, but I've forgotten the name.

Burning slower does not necessarily improve the quality of the burn. You should test for yourself, or else go with whatever the disc manufacturer recommends.
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ktf
post Nov 25 2013, 14:00
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QUOTE (ggg @ Nov 25 2013, 13:15) *
i think lower speed is always better for quality of record

It isn't. For comprehensive information on this matter, I'd head over to the Club Myce forums, there's a lot of talk about it. The general consensus is that very low speeds make the quality of your burn worse, as discs and recorders are tuned for their highest speeds. For the rest, it is black magic and involves a lot of trying and testing.

But that's of no relevance for the occasional burn. Just use the default speed and most of the time, you'll be fine.


--------------------
Music: sounds arranged such that they construct feelings.
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Makaki
post Nov 25 2013, 15:52
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The "Quality" of the Audio Data, or the Integrity of the data should be the same as long as the burn validates/verifies as OK (Like the 2nd post said). Else you have a failed burn, and have to burn the disc again.

The media should support the range of speed it specifies, and on any compatible drive. All settings should validate 100%, else there is defect on the media or the drive.

It's possible that a particular media+drive+setting combination may yield a higher percentage of successful burns, but I think nobody holds that data. The amount of media+drive+settings combinations possible is too large to perform those tests. It may very well be that the higher settings of a particular "combination" has been optimized and tested more, or it may be that for some other reason the slower settings are better, or maybe a setting in between! The truth is that nobody knows. And then you buy another brand of media, all that will change again.

In the past, where such high speeds were a breakthrough of both drive and media, the lower settings were considered more "Stable", but that shouldn't be the case today. Note that even though technology has advanced, priority will not always be quality. Some optical media out there focus on price before quality, and before durability.

Last but not least, remember to have backups of your data. Saving data exclusively on 1 piece of optical media, is probably a bad idea. So as long as you keep it on your hard drive or elsewhere, in case the optical media gets scratched over time, then you should be OK.

This post has been edited by Makaki: Nov 25 2013, 15:53
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pdq
post Nov 25 2013, 15:59
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QUOTE (Makaki @ Nov 25 2013, 09:52) *
The "Quality" of the Audio Data, or the Integrity of the data should be the same as long as the burn validates/verifies as OK (Like the 2nd post said). Else you have a failed burn, and have to burn the disc again.

My own testing, some years ago, showed that even on discs that had no uncorrected errors, there was a huge variation in the number of correctable errors, I took this as an indication of how readable a disc might be on other drives, or in future years, so I wouldn't rely solely on whether or not the disc verifies, especially for archiving purposes.

Of course, for archiving I wouldn't use optical media anyway.
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probedb
post Nov 25 2013, 20:39
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QUOTE (pdq @ Nov 25 2013, 14:59) *
Of course, for archiving I wouldn't use optical media anyway.


Indeed, home-burnt optical discs seem to be the worst thing for backups. All I use them for is burning MP3s onto CDs for when I have to borrow someone else's car that doesn't have a USB port wink.gif

This post has been edited by probedb: Nov 25 2013, 20:39
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DVDdoug
post Nov 25 2013, 21:34
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QUOTE (pdq @ Nov 25 2013, 04:54) *
There are programs that will test the quality of a CD or DVD in terms of number of correctable and uncorrectable errors. One that I used years ago was by Nero, but I've forgotten the name.
Nero DiscSpeed. (It's down at the bottom of the page with the FREE programs.) I test almost all of my burns with DiscSpeed, especially if the disc is for someone else.

It does some more advanced testing/reporting, but if the drive has to slow-down and re-read part of the disc, there is usually a glitch showing-up in the speed graph. So usually, I stop the testing as soon as the graph is drawn. There is a similar feature built-into ImgBurn.

The weakness of any kind of read/verify test is that it's only testing the disc on one drive. Sometimes you'll get an error/glitch on one drive and it will be OK on another.

I usually burn at "moderate" speeds, and lately I haven't had any trouble. I haven't done any "scientific" speed tests, so I don't know if things would be worse at higher speeds with my burners. When I have had trouble it's usually related to the media, and once I burn through the spindle of "bad" (unreliable) discs the problems go away. Once when about half the discs were bad or flakey, I threw away the remaing discs in the batch.

This post has been edited by DVDdoug: Nov 25 2013, 21:36
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