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stuck on stop
kittykat
post Aug 21 2013, 01:36
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I have a zenith allegro j584w that is stuck on stop, all other parts work (am/fm etc.) Is there a way I can try to get the turntable to work (preferably without having to take it in for a repair as a first option.) If anyone could help me I would greatly appreciate it!
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DVDdoug
post Aug 21 2013, 18:56
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It's probably a drive wheel or belt (I assume it has a drive wheel rather than a belt). These rubber parts "dry out". That's something you can probably change yourself but the parts might be very-hard to find.

I assume you can move the patter by hand? If it's If it's stuck or frozen, you might try some WD-40 or Liquid Wrench.

There is probably a retaining ring on the spindle holding the platter in-place. If you can remove the platter, you should see the motor & drive wheel (or belt) and you can determine if the motor is running.

If you have to pay for a repair, it's probably not worth it unless you really like that unit. Turntables are rare and modern all-in-one units are even more rare... You probably won't find something like that in your local audio/video store.

If you just want a "replacement" turntable, you can get a new (cheap) turntable for about the price of an hour of repair labor.* Most modern-cheap turntables have USB (for the computer) and line-level outputs to plug into a stereo receiver. If your all-in-one has a "Tape" or "Aux" input, you can use a new tukrntable with those inputs. (Higher-end turntables don't have line-outputs, and require a separate preamp, or you can use an older receiver with a "Phono" input.)




* It's often cheaper to replace than repair because they can build a brand new one on an automated assembly line with almost zero labor... And, the small amount of per-unit labor is usually low-skill 3rd-world labor. The parts are cheaper too, when you buy & ship in bulk.

This post has been edited by DVDdoug: Aug 21 2013, 19:19
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kittykat
post Aug 21 2013, 20:30
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I really like my turntable so I don't particularly want a new cheapy one. I had started taking it apart but ran into trouble trying to take the platter off, I don't know if I need to use some more elbow grease. I appreciate your reply very much!
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cliveb
post Aug 22 2013, 08:17
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QUOTE (kittykat @ Aug 21 2013, 20:30) *
I really like my turntable so I don't particularly want a new cheapy one. I had started taking it apart but ran into trouble trying to take the platter off, I don't know if I need to use some more elbow grease. I appreciate your reply very much!

I found a photo of this unit: http://www.radioatticarchives.com/radio.htm?radio=9303

My guess is that the platter might be retained by a circlip around the base of the centre spindle. If that is the case and you haven't removed it, additional brute force will achieve nothing other than to break it.

Turntables of this vintage usually had mechanical levers on the underside that operated the various switches, and it could well be that one or more of these has become detatched. You'll probably need to remove the entire turntable section from the base to see what's going on. I think I see a couple of screws at top-left and bottom-right that might be relevant. Two screws isn't enough, though, so there might be another underneath the Zenith badge at bottom-left, and/or maybe others that aren't visible in the photo.
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Ouroboros
post Aug 22 2013, 10:05
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I've dismantled a similar turntable. You have to remove the rubber mat from the top of the turntable to get to the circlip. This can be a bit tricky, because it's glued in place, and you have to remove it without bending the aluminium inserts. It requires a large flat blade (like a wallpaper scraper) and a bit of patience.

The two screws top left and bottom right are to fasten the floating turntable assembly to the base unit when the turntable is in transit. From memory I think that once the turntable is floating the screws aren't doing anything useful - but it's been a long time since I repaired my last one, so you should check. smile.gif
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Glenn Gundlach
post Aug 22 2013, 10:23
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Is the center spindle removable? It may require a push down and rotate to lift out. If so the retainer may be a simple circular spring (less than 1 turn) that can be removed and then remove the platter. I don't recall ever seeing a platter that required removal of the mat to get the platter off. The clip is easy to extract after the spindle is out of the way.

Beware it's VERY likely the lubricants have all turned to sludge and it won't run until its completely disassembled, cleaned and re-lubed. If you try it yourself take LOTS of pictures and be sure you know how to use the macro function on the camera to get good close-ups. It will be a 3D puzzle if you don't have pictures.

G
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kittykat
post Aug 22 2013, 13:01
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Thank you all for your replies! Its back in business. After I had put what I had taken apart back together and just "slept on it" I went back and it magically decided to work. My guess is by messing with it I broke some.of the gunk away enough to get er going. Thank you everyone for your awesome input!
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Glenn Gundlach
post Aug 22 2013, 17:23
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If that is indeed the case, you shouldn't run it because the lubricant isn't doing its job and the parts will wear out pretty quickly.

G

This post has been edited by Glenn Gundlach: Aug 22 2013, 17:23
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