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Snake Oil on Indiegogo
yourlord
post Oct 30 2014, 16:28
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I just found this campaign on Indiegogo for something called Geek Pulse. It's a DAC/headphone amp for your PC.. I died a little on the inside while reading that page.

Some choice selections:

"DACs are everywhere: in our phones, in our cable boxes, in our computers. Seriously. They're everywhere. The problem with the DACs that we find in all of our devices is simple: they're made to do the job with the least amount of effort and the lowest cost to build.
Geek Pulse is designed to differently. Instead of just barely getting the job done, it goes the extra mile to get the job done well. Very well. So well that there's no other DAC that can do what it does without having to pay three times the price."

$59 reward:
LightSpeed 1G USB Cable
MSRP: $99. LightSpeed 1G is an affordable high-end USB cable that boasts more than twice the bandwidth of USB 2.0's Audio Specification standard. Due to its wide bandwidth, the USB controller inside your DAC isn't overburdened when jitter makes its way into the signal, making your DAC run optimally and signal noise-free. $59 for 1 meter, $83 for 2m, or $101 for 3m.

$259 reward:
LightSpeed 2G USB Cable
MSRP: $449. This USB cable's bandwidth is four times USB 2.0's standard bandwidth of 480 MHz. Similar to LightSpeed 1G, the wide bandwidth of this cable ensures a low-jitter signal environment inside your DAC, giving you lifelike, bit-perfect music. $259 for 1m, $365 for 2m, or $512 for 3m.

$589 reward:
Geek Pulse
MSRP: $999. Geek Pulse is the world's most powerful 32/384 kHz + DSD128 desktop DAC and 3000 mW headphone amplifier. When it comes to the Geek Pulse family, this is what others might call a base model. We prefer to think of it as where awesome starts.

"[My] very early impressions were that the extension (treble to bass) was good... and evenly presented. Instrument separation was obvious and vocals were rich. Soundstage was actually a bit wider than I expected, which was a nice bonus." - J Exby, Geek Pulse backer

"I got to listen to the Pulse x/f/i at the booth & it sounded amazing. Listening to all 6 minutes of the Eagles Hotel California in 24/192 through Alpha Dogs should convince anyone that the Pulse is worth the wait. The detail was amazing, along with the soundstage." - Jody, Geek Pulse backer

If you want to go despair at the ignorance search for it on Indiegogo. I don't want to link to it cause it would feel dirty.
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lithopsian
post Oct 30 2014, 16:45
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Never let the facts get in the way of a good sales pitch wink.gif
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Satellite_6
post Oct 30 2014, 18:11
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$1,202,499 USD RAISED OF $38,000 GOAL

I wish I was a snake oil salesman. D:



--------------------
FLAC -> JDS Labs ODAC/O2 -> Sennheiser HD 650
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Kohlrabi
post Oct 30 2014, 18:36
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I'm not up to speed regarding advertising laws, but there shirley must be countries where conscious lies are illegal?

I'm puzzled where all the DSD users (also here on HA) suddenly come from. It looks like "audiophiles" just adore using the worst tech available.

This post has been edited by Kohlrabi: Oct 30 2014, 18:41


--------------------
It's only audiophile if it's inconvenient.
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godrick
post Oct 30 2014, 18:43
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Shirley, I initiated advertising actions a few times against audio scams like jplay, but unfortunately the industry-policed enforcers are happy with replacing outright lies with weasel words that convey the original misleading message. Truth in advertising is an entirely different proposition, altogether.

This post has been edited by godrick: Oct 30 2014, 18:44
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Arnold B. Kruege...
post Oct 30 2014, 20:20
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QUOTE (Satellite_6 @ Oct 30 2014, 13:11) *
$1,202,499 USD RAISED OF $38,000 GOAL

I wish I was a snake oil salesman. D:


How many ways can we game the Indiegogo fund raising totals? ;-)
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andy o
post Nov 1 2014, 05:15
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Meh, this is NOTHING for Indiegogo.

See your dumb USB cables, raise you a FREE ENERGY MACHINE.

There is little doubt in my mind that Indiegogo not only allows clear scams in their page, but even encourages them. See the Indiegogo stories on Pando.com, for instance, or look up the history of one of the most successful IG campaigns, the Healbe Gobe. Also look up Smarty Ring, or the Ritot watch, and countless others.

An excellent skeptical site analyzing these campaigns (or "scampaigns" which are most of the IG ones) is drop-kicker.com.
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andy o
post Nov 1 2014, 05:16
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^sorry, QUANTUM free energy.
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Porcus
post Nov 1 2014, 10:30
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But those $ figures are for real? Or not necessarily? Maybe someone has made a helluvalot of fake pledges to themselves, speculating that big numbers spawn enough buzz around the 'net to be worth Indiegogo's 4 % charge? Or have I gotten the cardinality of the infinite human stupidity wrong here?
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Arnold B. Kruege...
post Nov 2 2014, 14:23
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QUOTE (Porcus @ Nov 1 2014, 05:30) *
But those $ figures are for real? Or not necessarily? Maybe someone has made a helluvalot of fake pledges to themselves, speculating that big numbers spawn enough buzz around the 'net to be worth Indiegogo's 4 % charge? Or have I gotten the cardinality of the infinite human stupidity wrong here?


Lets say that those aren't pledges, but *Actual contributions*.

Who do the contributions go to and what fees get taken out of them?

Well, the contributions go to the guy organizing the fund raiser and if they comes from him, that money is in a closed loop, no?

I don't know what Indiegogo's fee structure is like, but it is probably not that much worse than eBay's.

People bidding up the price of piece of rare used gear on eBay and then making it look like a valid closed auction by paying themselves is an old story.
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andy o
post Nov 2 2014, 17:03
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One of the ways Indiegogo encouragees scammers which Kickstarter doesn't have is so-called "flexible funding", in which the campaigner doesn't have to raise a set amount before a set date. He just gets every contribution, no matter the "goal", but oddly enough there are a goal and a date. It doesn't make any sense to fund that way, unless it's just donations, but Indiegogo, again, is perfectly happy with people scamming others if they get their cut, even going so far as changing the wording on their fraud "protection" text to be just vague enough after a clear milliion-dollar scam is exposed by the media (not, you know, shutting it down).

In this particular instance it's an apparently new "forever funding" mode. I thought Indiegogo were shameless enough, but apparently not.

This post has been edited by andy o: Nov 2 2014, 17:04
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Arnold B. Kruege...
post Nov 3 2014, 14:45
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QUOTE (andy o @ Nov 2 2014, 11:03) *
One of the ways Indiegogo encouragees scammers which Kickstarter doesn't have is so-called "flexible funding", in which the campaigner doesn't have to raise a set amount before a set date. He just gets every contribution, no matter the "goal", but oddly enough there are a goal and a date. It doesn't make any sense to fund that way, unless it's just donations, but Indiegogo, again, is perfectly happy with people scamming others if they get their cut, even going so far as changing the wording on their fraud "protection" text to be just vague enough after a clear milliion-dollar scam is exposed by the media (not, you know, shutting it down).

In this particular instance it's an apparently new "forever funding" mode. I thought Indiegogo were shameless enough, but apparently not.


Agreed. IndieGoGO should have "Caveat Emptor" cautions plastered all over it.
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Porcus
post Nov 5 2014, 01:17
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QUOTE (Arnold B. Krueger @ Nov 2 2014, 15:23) *
Well, the contributions go to the guy organizing the fund raiser and if they comes from him, that money is in a closed loop, no?

I don't know what Indiegogo's fee structure is like, but it is probably not that much worse than eBay's.


AFAI can see, they take 4 percent. So the loop isn't completely closed.
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